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  #1  
Old 02/04/13, 11:05 AM
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$150 Dollar Grocery Budget

Now, that oldest son has his own place it's just youngest son and I at home. Oldest DS could eat for two people at 6 '6' . Youngest DS is 6 '3' and rising. I figure I am grocery shopping for just three people now This weekend I shopped the sales, used a few coupons and managed to save $77.

My strategies include a pitcher of iced tea always available in fridge, lots of cut veggies and black bean dip ( home made) and apples for snacks. No red meat. Plenty of chicken and a frozen turkey in the freezer. DS is really getting into the swing of things, he made a tasty rice and bean supper last night. Today, I will make several loaves of bread. I have $92 dollars left for montlhy grocery budget....wish me luck!

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Old 02/04/13, 11:37 AM
 
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This is going to be quite difficult and require a lot of planning and invention. I do wish you luck.

I have found that soup (mostly vegetable), served at the beginning of the meal, with hearty homemade bread not only provides a lot of nutrition but also helps fill hollow legs. Whole grain breads with homemade yogurt cheese, hummus or peanut (or other nut) butter makes a great and filling snack.

Another important step in controlling the food budget is portion control - the size and number. When we started this a few years ago no one ever left the table hungry but no one over ate anymore. And it made an instant impact on the grocery dollars.

The pitchers of orange juice and milk used to sit on the table and they were always emptied and refilled. A serving size of juice is a half cup (a cup for growing kids) not two tumbler fulls. Juice is for nutrition, water to quench thirstl The size and amount of food differs with each person but what is a proper serving size has really become scued in our society.

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Old 02/04/13, 11:46 AM
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Emdeengee, you made some excellent points. Portion control is important and something we've needed to work on for quite a while. Oldest DS rode his bike, worked outdoors and burned calories like nobody's business. Youngest DS and I aren't nearly as physically active.

Hummus, I make once a week. Soup is a favorite here also. Oatmeal for breakfast is filling and quite tasty, much to my surprise. I've noticed after eating less but better these past few days...I FEEL better!

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Old 02/04/13, 12:10 PM
 
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I like stretching my food. I boiled 4 chicken legs/thighs yesterday and got chicken stock as well as the chicken. Then I used my cast iron skillet and sauteed some rice with butter and onions. Added chicken stock, 1 can diced tomates and garlic, bay leaves, seasonings and 1/2 diced chili pepper. Add 1 cup chicken and cook. Best meal and fed 5 people with large appetites yesterday. Cost me maybe $2.50. Love recipes that stretch your food.

$150 for a month can be done, but takes diligence and planning. Try to hit double coupon days, no coupon-don't buy it, look for recipes that fill but stretch your food. I only spend $350-$400 on my family of 7. Not including paper and cleaning products. But even those we save a lot of money on. If you find any tips that work for you be sure to let us know

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Old 02/04/13, 12:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by homefire2007 View Post
Emdeengee, you made some excellent points. Portion control is important and something we've needed to work on for quite a while. Oldest DS rode his bike, worked outdoors and burned calories like nobody's business. Youngest DS and I aren't nearly as physically active.

Hummus, I make once a week. Soup is a favorite here also. Oatmeal for breakfast is filling and quite tasty, much to my surprise. I've noticed after eating less but better these past few days...I FEEL better!
This was my discovery as well! And over time you will find you have more energy. The whole process of digestion uses up an enormous amount of energy which is why all the uncles and fathers and grandfathers fall asleep on the couch after a big feast at our house.

When people work hard physically they do use more energy so require more fuel. We never denied anyone food when they were hungry but we did "control" over-eating. The whole portion thing for us started when I wanted to lose weight and it quickly became obvious just how much we were eating in excess of what we really needed. And we ate better quality food.

Processed foods and ready to eat foods cost much more than their value. It sounds like you are a cook who makes from scratch and this is a great way to save.

My family loves pasta dishes. Whenever I make them (lasagna, spaghetti Bolongnaise, Chicken Alfredo, Macaroni and Cheese) I make big quantities and then I freeze them in small portion sizes. If someone is really hungry between meals they can always take one from the freezer. Same with Chilli. I make both a meat and a vegetarian version. A cup of chilli and a slice of bread will satisfy even the biggest appetite between meals.

I have always canned a lot of fruit "compotes" when the fruit is ripe and in season. Apple sauce, pear compote, peach compote, plum butter , berry compote etc. These are always available. Bananas are also a good snack especially when they are on sale. I buy very ripe bananas and slice them onto a baking tray and quick freeze them. They make a great frozen snack and can be thrown in to a blender with some fruit and yogurt for a quick energy drink.

I don't buy cookies and only make them once in a while but they are very filling and a nice treat (oatmeal, peanut butter and chocolate chip). I also make bran muffins. I make extra oatmeal (cook until thick) and throw in some raisins. I then put it in a rectangular container and cut into squares. Refrigerate. One square heated in the microwave with some brown sugar or maple syrup on top is also a good between meal snack. I cook my oatmeal in milk which makes it very creamy.
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  #6  
Old 02/04/13, 12:58 PM
 
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Sounds like you and your DS are doing a great job by eating low on the food chain, using plenty of unprocessed whole foods, and making your own bread, hummus and bean dip.

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  #7  
Old 02/04/13, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by homefire2007 View Post
DS is really getting into the swing of things, he made a tasty rice and bean supper last night.
Theres no better way to stretch the grocery budget than rice n beans. Well, other than maybe beans n rice.
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  #8  
Old 02/04/13, 02:08 PM
 
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Try budget101.com's $50 week menu with recipes

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  #9  
Old 02/04/13, 06:24 PM
 
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Don't forget eggs which make a great omelet or fried egg sandwich.

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  #10  
Old 02/04/13, 06:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by soulsurvivor View Post
Don't forget eggs which make a great omelet or fried egg sandwich.
X2 ,I will also add , french toast, pancakes , egg burritos , get that son out fishing and put a bunch in the freezer . get ahold of the local game warden or sheriff and see if you can get in on a fresh road killed deer or 2
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  #11  
Old 02/04/13, 07:16 PM
 
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Coco wheats are tasty and very filling.
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  #12  
Old 02/04/13, 07:35 PM
 
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Eating HEALTHY foods can be expensive, if everything has to be purchased from the store. I can either buy a big tub of cheese balls for, what, five bucks, and have snacks for a month for the kids, or I can spend $7 on a bag of apples and have snacks for a week. It kind of stinks! HOWEVER, yes, you can eat on a severely limited budget. I'll be following along to see how everything goes for you!

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  #13  
Old 02/04/13, 07:52 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NE Oklahoma
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when i have to really buckle down and get the budget down low, i immediately try to cut down on the amount of cheese intake..as it is so expensive.

we do one or two meatless meals per week and have lots of meals where one whole chicken can be stretched to at least 3 nights of meals. as you are doing, i also make my own bread to use for sandwiches, french toast, popovers (if you have chickens for "free" eggs, otherwise each batches 3 eggs, not economical if using store bought), biscuits, use powdered or canned milk to make gravy, make your tortillas to help make those meat stretching meals.

so we don't feel so restricted, i will try to budget in fresh fruit, but limit to once piece a day until its gone, and then its gone until its time for shopping again...that way, you at least get some fruit, but i buy what's on sale or i use canned also.

also, i make any snack foods like inexpensive homemade cookies (usually snickerdoodles) or no bakes, or granola bars, etc.

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  #14  
Old 02/04/13, 08:36 PM
 
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Don't forget Cornell Triple Rich Bread formula to increase protein and nutrition- when making bread, pizza crust or noodles, start by adding to the cup measure you will use for flour- 1 tbsp dry milk solids, 1 tbsp wheat germ, and 1 tbbsp soy flour. Then fill the measure to the top with flour.
I also sometimes thro in flaxseed meal.
Back in the days before bread machines, when I was a welfare mom with a 5 year old and an infant and $33 a month in food stamps, saturday was baking day- 2 loaves of bread, a pizza crust for that night's dinner, and noodles for Sunday dinner with the above formula. Edited to add - noodles rolled with a rolling pin and cut with a butter knife- you don't need a pasta machine!!

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  #15  
Old 02/04/13, 09:11 PM
 
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Location: Missouri Ozarks
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I just spent $60.00 for a leg of lamb roast for next Sunday's dinner....add a bottle of wine at $19 or so, frisee and arugula salad fixings at $7.00, some Yukon Gold potatoes at $5.00, some heavy cream at $1.50, fixings for home made crusty dinner rolls at say $3.00 and then a chocolate mousse for dessert at about $7.00 and I am already over $100 (this is for 4 adults). I personally could not make it on $150 a month.

Of course we dont always have expensive meats like that and we grow most of our own vegetables, have chickens for eggs, cattle for beef and we hunt but if you take the time to cost out how much those "free" veggies, eggs, chickens, deer, turkeys and the beef actually cost the $60.00 lamb roast doesnt come out that bad.

Another poster hit it on the head, its expensive to eat healthy. We dont have a microwave and eat virtually no processed foods but high quality meat, vegetables (in the off season) and fresh fruit is expensive and I kind of wonder if these extremely low food budgets are real healthy. I have always thought that food stamps and the like should be on a graduated scale; i.e., you get more purchasing power when buying raw ingredients and fresh fruits and vegetables. As it stands we almost encourage poor health in the very people who cannot afford ill health.

Milled rice is filling but even when enriched (required in the US) its not a very nutritional staple and the heavy reliance on pasta and breads doesnt seem all that great either. Its frustrating that with all the money spent on various safety net programs that we cant come up with a simple solution to get produce down to a level where it can be considered a go to for those with pecuniary challenges.

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  #16  
Old 02/04/13, 09:18 PM
 
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Salmonslayer, You must be what my Mom would say people living high on the hog!!

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Old 02/04/13, 09:23 PM
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DW makes quite a bit of bread. A good bread maker pays for itself, eventually.
I also find that certain, unpopular white fish varieties can be an excellent protein source. A new one for us here recently was Swai. It showed up around May of last year and they were practically giving it away.

Any chance you can grab some food for 'free'? Deer, turkey, rabbits, squirrel, fish, etc. How about foraging? I bet a few $ can be saved there. (They aren't really free, I realize. But maybe you've already spent the cash on gear).

...don't fall for cheap calories...You need to keep those boys growing up, not out.

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  #18  
Old 02/04/13, 09:45 PM
 
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Salmonslayer, You must be what my Mom would say people living high on the hog!!
No, we have a big Sunday dinner coming up and I was just using that as an example of how expensive it is to eat well or even healthy (lamb is a good meat but very expensive around here for some reason). We dont usually eat expensive meals like that but we do eat a lot of fresh vegetables and fruits which are really expensive even here in the Ozarks. We also eat a lot of sea food which around here consists of frog legs, tilapia and catfish so we order our sea food from a specialty shop, again not cheap. Nutritionists say to eat a healthy and balanced diet with lots of fish, vegetables, and fresh fruit but more and more thats very hard to do on a limited food budget.

As for the wine, its medicinal....my last AARP mag says dark chocolate and a glass of wine or two is good for you.
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  #19  
Old 02/04/13, 11:41 PM
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Try to hit double coupon days, no coupon-don't buy it,
That would be very hard as most things I buy do not have coupons. We grow most of our own food & I still spend on average $150 a week for a family of 8. That includes all toiletries, laundry supplies, etc. Shoot, I spend at least $25 a week on milk. All of the goats ahve finally kidded, so that will be gone soon.
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Old 02/05/13, 06:33 AM
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The only things I can think of to add are popcorn for snacks popped in a pan on the stove; bean burritos and tostadas made with cooked-from-scratch beans; homemade pizza, go light on the cheese; burgers made with beans, lentils, rice, etc. I had a black bean burger with corn salsa, and it was very good. My dh also likes cinnamon toast for a snack. My budget is a little less than yours, but I have a large garden, fruit trees, berries, and eggs. I also know that food costs more in Vermont than here.

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  #21  
Old 02/05/13, 07:18 AM
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I am counting the days until the CSA I belong to starts production. That will be awhile here in Vermont Before I made this budget, I had a reasonably large amount of pantry items. TP, shampoo, deodorant, etc. were stocked up on when coupons were at their best (about a year ago)!

Brown rice, flour, oatmeal are bought in bulk at the Co-op. I am on a tight budget here for the next three months. Vitamins were also bought with coupons a while ago. We are a pretty healthy bunch and I think this food plan will be fine...even for my 6 '3' growing boy! It has really been wonderful to see him enthusiastic about this. I work long hours, so his help is vital to this challenge.

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Old 02/05/13, 09:39 AM
 
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The cost of groceries can vary depending on your location. For instance, I know that Florida has some really high grocery prices. When dh and I were on vacation we had sticker shock when we walked into the grocery store.

What really surprises me is how much the price of produce varies amoung areas. I can buy a huge bag of oranges or apples (when on sale) for less than $5.00. I can buy bananas for .39 cents per pound. Grapes are not in season, but when they are I can get them for .99 per pound. We can buy 50# bags of red potatoes for as little as $11.00. Last time I checked a 25# bag of onions was less than $8.00 (can't remember the exact price). I've found 5# bags of carrots on sale for $1.99 as well. Cabbage will be on sale in a few weeks so I am thinking of buying some in order to try the canned cole slaw recipe that someone posted on here.

I think the trick to getting more bang for your buck is to really get to know your grocery store. Know your prices, get to know the sales, what's in season, find out when they mark down meats for a quick sale, and try and stock up if you have a little extra cash.

OP: It sounds like you are on the right track. I wish you luck with your budget. It seems pretty doable for two people.

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Old 02/05/13, 09:52 AM
 
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I notice that when I am hungry or lonely the TV ads are even more enticing. I often think of ordering pizza, but never do. I make my own. I make the dough in my bread machine and top it with jar spegetti sauce and whatever else I have around. I roll my crust out on the pizza, brush it with Italian salad dressing pan and put the sauce on it, and bake it about 10 minutes, then add the other toppings and cheese. I watch for shredded cheese on sale and keep a few on hand. The nice thing here is the variety of items that can be salvaged and used on pizza is unlimited. I usually have olives on hand, one can do wonders with a slice or two of leftover bacon or a sausage patty, a little onion or pepper, or a dab of this or that.

For a quick meal or snacks mini pizzas made with English muffins from the bakery store make an economical and tasty snack.

If your family likes it, homemade stuffing can be an economical filler in a meal too. It goes with just about anything, and again can be made with leftovers.

I bought several bags of the microwave in the bag veggies that were marked down to .99 in my fresh produce section. I made stir fry with the vegtable mix, cooked the green beans as they were, and will be using the broccoli/cauliflower min to make soup. The work is all done for you, the food was still fresh and I felt they were a real timesaver. I often buy the cabbage shreds when they are reduced too and run them through the food processor at home to chop it finer and make cole slaw.

I have never tried it, but I have seen barbecue or sloppy joe recipies stretched with oatmeal.

Potato pancakes are good this time of year. A friend used to make then for her kids often, she made them in her blender, just tossed all the ingredients in and let it whirl. Kids loved them. They are good with applesauce.

My daughter has three boys and a full time and demanding job. She likes to can, but it really is not practical for her right now, as she in on call with her work. She gets such a good deal on canned tomato products at the bent and dent store she can't justify canning her own. We had drought this summer and even with watering, her garden did not do well.

Sometimes things need to be evaluated too. I used to make my own hot chocolate mix, with the Quick, powdered mild and coffee creamer. It was nice to have, but it seemed like the kids just drank more of it, and it was not a saving thing.

I am alone, now, but I did raise five hungry kids. They ate like hogs and were all healthy and slender and tall. I think I spend more on cat food now than myself, but I did used to really pinch the pennies. I had to.

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Old 02/05/13, 12:20 PM
 
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Homefire- I am not sure how tight the rest of your budget is but can you squeeze out $25 to $50 a month for stocking up?

We have a separate grocery budget from the stocking up budget and have found that this works really well. It gives us the ability to buy extra items when on sale without having to dip into the actual daily grocery budget. And this saves a lot of money in the long run.

We live a cash life so I carry this extra stocking up cash in my purse in a zip lock bag so that I always have it but it is separte from the grocery money (also in a zip lock bag). Shopping with cash is easy if you keep things separate. I also have a zip lock bag for gasoline. You can keep your coupons right in the bag as well.

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Old 02/05/13, 12:29 PM
 
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I think that it is very important to know your grocery prices especially for items you buy regularly.

I have a lot of items memorized but I also keep a columnar note book. I mark in the item and the regular price and then use the other columns to mark in sale prices and the date of the sale.

Stores do have rotating sales during the year. Certain items will have their lowest price at certain times of the year. For instance most canned fruit and veggies will be at their lowest sale price in the summer when fresh produce and gardens are producing and people are canning. Sugar and vinegar are usually at their highest price during this time and even when on sale are not at the lowest sale price.

It is also very important to always check your grocery bill before you leave the parking lot. I have found hundreds of mistakes that have added up to a lot of money. When you are charged for leeks at $3.89 but you actually bought celery at $1.48 you are the loser. Or you can really be taken advantage of if an item is on sale (so you buy several) but the cash rings it through at the regular price.

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Old 02/05/13, 12:32 PM
 
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If you already have a full pantry, you're in a good position. I try to buy bulk, in season and can. Bought twobushels of peppers and one of green beans this summer for $5 each. Amish. I like to hit the amish stands at the end of the day. Cold or rainy days are even better. They're motivated to sell at a lower price just so they don't have to take it back. They already have plenty at home and need some cash more than they need the excess produce. The produce might not make it to next week's sale. Anyways, the ladies usually expect to see me on yucky days when they're ready to pack up and will price just about any bushel of anything for $5.
Lamb, funny that should be brought up. We bought a lamb for $100, paid $55 to have it completely butchered and packed and brought home 43lbs of meat. That's the going price here for nasty, pale pink, 20% fat ground beef bought in bulk here, and we got stew meat, roasts, chops and ground meat for the same price. Plus a pelt to play with. If we had dogs, I could've gotten the bones for them as well. The weight wasn't counting heart and liver, which will be fed to the cat or the chickens. We were actually quite wasteful with that lamb and could've stretched t further by keeping more of it to make stock and such.

I'm a blabber mouth, but moral of my long-winded response is that with a full pantry, you can eat from the pantry and stock up on things as you find good deals. Find flour at $0.99/5lbs? Buy fifty pounds, spend ten bucks and supplement whatever you couldn't buy from the pantry. Next week, find chicken leg quarters at $0.59/lb? Buy 34lbs for $20, use that flour to make chicken gravy. I can use a leg per person and make three full meals from it. One leg is about a pound. Can even make chicken pot pie with those two ingredients (add spices for flavoring the noodles), just roll your noodles out and cut them and cook with the broth. Potatoes on sale at $1.99/5lbs? Buy what you can afford and store. Basically, you're just building your pantry with bulk sales deals and using them to save money when you find other great deals and can put that week's budget into the sale deal.

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Old 02/05/13, 12:46 PM
 
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I spend atleast $150 a WEEK on groceries. And that is with coupons and sales! I am not able to stock up on very many items right now, hopefully that will change when I get my tax refund! Kudos to you for even attempting to make it on $150 for a month. I don't know that $150 would be enough to feed me (alone) for a month. Add in my SO and 3 boys full time... No way! Impossible! Unless we ate ramen noodles for the whole month and I refuse to eat that carp!

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Old 02/05/13, 01:13 PM
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$150 would buy a LOT of ramen noodles... lol


What I would do is allocate a sum of money per category- an amount for dairy, protein (meat, eggs, peanut butter, etc...) grains, fruits and veggies, and oils/sweets. I do this on my weekly budget- it is not set in stone but it is useful.

Check the frozen section for fruits and vegetables. They are often much cheaper than fresh, especially this time of year. Soups, stews and casseroles will be a good use of your food dollar.

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Old 02/05/13, 02:20 PM
 
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With 3 teenage boys full time, my SO 2 teenage boys every other weekend, myself and my SO, $150 of ramen noodles could be gone in no time! When I do buy them, each boy eats 2-3 packages per sitting. IDK where these boys put all of the food that they eat!!

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Old 02/05/13, 02:43 PM
 
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Wow. I thought my kids ate a lot when we eat 2 packs for three people!

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