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  #1  
Old 12/07/10, 10:51 AM
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? re: using an electric roaster

Have never used one of those large, electric roasters, so I'd appreciate some help, please.

I've been asked to make a roaster full of mashed potatoes. My question(s), do you cook the potatoes in the roaster, or do you cook them first and then transfer them to the roaster just to keep hot?

tx a lot,

stef

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Old 12/07/10, 12:03 PM
 
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I would cook them first,then transfer them to the roaster to keep warm. Be sure to add a little extra liquid and stir them in the roaster occasionally or the edges will dry out and get crispy.

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Old 12/07/10, 12:59 PM
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I have a roaster oven that I use for everything but I have no idea how you would make mashed potatoes IN the oven. I guess you could just make them on the stovetop and transfer them to the roaster to keep warm.

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Old 12/07/10, 02:02 PM
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Thanks, folks.
I figured it would be a two-step process, but thought I'd ask first.
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Old 12/07/10, 02:17 PM
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Edited because I read the OP wrong. Sorry.

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Last edited by arabian knight; 12/07/10 at 02:59 PM.
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Old 12/07/10, 02:37 PM
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You could boil your potatoes in it. I have gotten a good rolling boil of liquids in mine.

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Old 12/07/10, 02:51 PM
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Remove the inner pan and add some water to the outer pan, then replace the inner pan. This should help your potatoes from drying out.

A recipe we use for make ahead mashed potatoes is this:

Gourmet mashed potatoes;
5 lbs potatoes
6 oz cream cheese
1 cup sour cream
2tsp onion salt
3 tsp butter
1/2 cup milk

Boil the peeled potatoes and mash them. Add the butter & slowly add the cream cheese, sour cream and onion salt. Add milk until the right consistency. Beat until light and fluffy. Bake for 1 hour at 350. Can be made several days ahead and kept in the fridge until needed.

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Old 12/07/10, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Common Tator View Post
You could boil your potatoes in it. I have gotten a good rolling boil of liquids in mine.
Ya really, what is the difference between a Big electric roaster like churches might have, and a large Crock-Pot?
Not only roasts meat, but potatoes, and anything else you put in it.
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Old 12/07/10, 05:27 PM
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Ya really, what is the difference between a Big electric roaster like churches might have, and a large Crock-Pot?
My crock pot doesn't get nearly as hot as the enameled roaster gets.
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Old 12/07/10, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Common Tator View Post
My crock pot doesn't get nearly as hot as the enameled roaster gets.
Same here. My mom water bath cans in roaster (pints only, obviously). My crock pot will get a slow boil after 8 hours or so.....that would be some slow cooked mashed potatoes, lol.
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Old 12/07/10, 06:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Ohio dreamer View Post
Same here. My mom water bath cans in roaster (pints only, obviously). My crock pot will get a slow boil after 8 hours or so.....that would be some slow cooked mashed potatoes, lol.
Sure that is after 8 hours on slow cooking.
But for the last few weeks of football on Sunday's, every Sunday.
I put a roast in the slow cooker at night. Now that is just the Roast mind you.
And when I get up and moving around I turn the Crock Pot on HIGH. For the next 3 hours.
And Less then One Hour before the game starts I put in a Large Potato. No I do not cut it up either. it is a Large Baking Potato maybe even Two spuds if the roast is large and I have plenty for another day.
And guess what? 45 minutes to One Hour I sit down that Potato is Done. Maybe even falling apart it is sooooo done. And I enjoy a nice Home raised beef roast and mashed spuds.
And it is not a very expensive one either. at 40 bucks for a 7 Qt one.
I am not sure what you all have but mine will sure do a large potato pretty quickly on the high setting.
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Last edited by arabian knight; 12/07/10 at 06:47 PM.
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Old 12/07/10, 06:44 PM
 
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The Mrs. likes to use hers to pre-heat her jars for canning.

As for the origional question, I'd make your mashed taters on the stove and them keep em warm in your roaster.

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Old 12/07/10, 07:03 PM
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Same here. My mom water bath cans in roaster (pints only, obviously).
I've been thinking of doing this. I think I'll try it with high acid foods only, of course.
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Old 12/07/10, 07:06 PM
 
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DW got one for a Christmas present, but she used it on Thanksgiving. It's 22 quart, goes from 150 to 450 degrees, and she's loving it. I never thought about canning in it but there is plenty of room.

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  #15  
Old 12/07/10, 07:28 PM
 
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I'd cook the potatoes right in the roaster... it should work fine and one less BIG dish to wash...

I'd take my little 'magic wand and mash the potatoes after cooking and draining most of the liquid out... butter, can of milk, salt and pepper... good to go.

dawn

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Old 12/07/10, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by sewsilly View Post
I'd cook the potatoes right in the roaster...
Me too.

I've never made mashed potatoes, but I often make creamy potatoe chunks in my roaster.

Cook at 300 or so for about 6 or 7 hours, or 375-425 for 3-4 hours.
I put my cream, butter, etc. straight into the roaster with my spuds, crank the heat and forget about it.
Stir once or twice if I can get back to the house to do so. Mine are usually in chunks for the simple fact that it's less work and the cream kind of cooks into the spuds and the two make a "sauce" of sorts. But you could easily mash them at this point, too.

PS: I cook 20 lbs at a time.
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  #17  
Old 12/07/10, 09:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ErinP View Post
Me too.

I've never made mashed potatoes, but I often make creamy potatoe chunks in my roaster.

Cook at 300 or so for about 6 or 7 hours, or 375-425 for 3-4 hours.
I put my cream, butter, etc. straight into the roaster with my spuds, crank the heat and forget about it.
Stir once or twice if I can get back to the house to do so. Mine are usually in chunks for the simple fact that it's less work and the cream kind of cooks into the spuds and the two make a "sauce" of sorts. But you could easily mash them at this point, too.

PS: I cook 20 lbs at a time.
Hmmm, interesting option.
Thanks, Erin.
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