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  #1  
Old 02/08/10, 02:24 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Northern Ontario
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Pudding Meat??

For Christmas, Santa brought me this amazingly wonderful Amish Cookbook. I love it. There is a recipe in there I want to try for Ponhoss, never had it before but it sounds good. The recipe calls for pudding meat, what on earth do they mean by that???

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  #2  
Old 02/08/10, 02:31 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Northeast Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jil101ca View Post
The recipe calls for pudding meat, what on earth do they mean by that???
Puddings are finely ground head meat, seasoned something like sausage. The term seems to be most used in Pennsylvania. In other parts of the country, the same thing is called head cheese. Probably someone will post to disagree with the latter name. I'm not endorsing it, just pointing out it is used -- right or wrong.

When puddings are available in stores, they are sold in loaves wrapped in plastic.

Puddings are good in the place of sausage, and "pancakes and puddings" is a household term in some areas.

River
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  #3  
Old 02/08/10, 02:48 PM
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Location: SW Va
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I don't know if this is a help but I found this.
The pudding meat hog skin, livers, kidneys, and bones.

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  #4  
Old 02/08/10, 03:06 PM
Hillybilly cattle slaves
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Grant Co WV/ Washington Co MD
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liver pudding is similar to scrapple. It's greasier than scrapple though cause it has more meat in it than scrapple does. I get both when I have my hog butchered but I like scrapple better cause it's not as greasy but the guys eat the liver pudding first.

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  #5  
Old 02/08/10, 03:08 PM
This is my life
 
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Location: SC
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One of the butchers we use will trade the hogs head for pudding (pronounced puddin here ) lol
It is sliced and fried up to be served with grits and eggs for breakfast.

It is made of livers, hearts and the meat from the head and is very dark in color.

PS...my grandmother use to make a meat from a boiled hogs head called souse, or hogs head cheese. It was kind of jelled with bits of spicy meat in it

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  #6  
Old 02/08/10, 03:15 PM
Hillybilly cattle slaves
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Grant Co WV/ Washington Co MD
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Originally Posted by Kmac15 View Post
One of the butchers we use will trade the hogs head for pudding (pronounced puddin here ) lol
It is sliced and fried up to be served with grits and eggs for breakfast.

It is made of livers, hearts and the meat from the head and is very dark in color.

PS...my grandmother use to make a meat from a boiled hogs head called souse, or hogs head cheese. It was kind of jelled with bits of spicy meat in it
That's exactly how we pronounce it and eat it here. It's great but not diet food.

Ponhoss is usually the PA dutch name for scrapple
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  #7  
Old 02/08/10, 03:46 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Northern Ontario
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So it is.....head cheese??? Meat that would become gelantis (is that a word? lol) Pork hocks, the head, organs ect? all cooked together?....

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  #8  
Old 02/08/10, 04:10 PM
Hillybilly cattle slaves
 
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Location: Grant Co WV/ Washington Co MD
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No, it's not head cheese, that is souse. Liver mush or pudding is ground up hog parts along with the liver that are flavored with spices and molded into blocks. You fry it. Scrapple is the hog juice mixed with cornmeal and spices and molded. You fry it too.

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  #9  
Old 02/08/10, 06:09 PM
newfieannie
 
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head cheese is what i make from the hogs head. i'm not sure if this is what it means. maybe it's suet. i use that for steamed puddings. maybe if the op posted the recipe and we could see what comes before and after pudding meat we might be of more help.~Georgia.

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  #10  
Old 02/08/10, 07:23 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Northern Ontario
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recipe for Ponhoss

The book I received from Santa is called Mennonite Country-style Recipes and Kitchen Secrets by Esther H Shank. Definately recommend this recipe book, very easy to understand with step by step instructions.

8 cups pork or beef broth
2 1/2 cups pudding meat, more or less.....heat in heavy cooker

2 cups corn meal
1/2 cup flour
1 tsp sugar..... combine 1st then slowly mix into broth, stirring constantly (add while broth is still cool to avoid lumping

Cook for 1hr, stirring constantly at 1st, then less often the longer it cooks just to keep it from sticking. Remove from heat, let set a few minutes to collect excess fat. Skim of all you can, add salt if needed and pour into 2 loaf pans. when chilled, slice, flour and fry in a little margarine or butter. serve with eggs or with syrupor apple butter.

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  #11  
Old 02/08/10, 09:43 PM
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Ahh your making Scrapple, good stuff

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  #12  
Old 02/09/10, 05:52 AM
Hillybilly cattle slaves
 
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Location: Grant Co WV/ Washington Co MD
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I agree, it sounds like she is making scrapple. I have an older version of that book and the receipe is titled Old Fashioned Cornmeal Mush. Adding the pudding meat is what makes it go from cornmealmush to scrapple.

I have never made it since I have the butcher shop make my pudding and scrapple for me. I think you will have to get the meat from the butcher shop and they may not do it in your area but it wouldn't hurt to ask

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  #13  
Old 02/09/10, 08:14 AM
newfieannie
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: nova scotia
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ok so scrapple is not a dish i'm familar with.i've never cooked with cornmeal. looks like you want meat that will gel if you cut it and fry. sounds something like the english brawn i make without the cornmeal. like others have said you might get the pudding meat at the butchers. for my brawn i make my own from pork hocks and veal shank.~Georgia.

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  #14  
Old 02/09/10, 10:04 AM
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Tennessee
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Scrapple has more flavor than ponhaus. I add several spices when I make scrapple.

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  #15  
Old 02/09/10, 10:21 AM
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Location: Eastern Washington
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From The Amish Cook
"Pon Hoss is made with the juice that's left from the pork bones that have been cooked in the iron kettle. It is made with a thickening of flour or cornmeal and some liver pudding. We season it with salt and pepper. After it is cooked and thickened in the iron kettle, it is put into loaf pans to chill. When it's chilled, we cut it into slices and fry it in a skillet 'til golden brown."

"Liver pudding is an old recipe, made while butchering pork. It comes from the head meat and the bones, which are cooked soft in an iron kettle. The meat goes through a grinder and gets mixed up."

Hope this helps.

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  #16  
Old 02/09/10, 12:40 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Mid Michigan
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They all sound dreadful. I think I will pass.

Limey

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  #17  
Old 02/09/10, 12:47 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Missouri
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It sounds wonderful, like a real treat for the dogs. I can't stand liver, just the smell of it cooking makes me gag. Nasty stuff!!

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  #18  
Old 02/09/10, 12:49 PM
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Is it possible to can pudding meat?

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  #19  
Old 02/09/10, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oggie View Post
Is it possible to can pudding meat?
The author of the cookbook I have says they put their's in jars and processed immediately.
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