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  #1  
Old 05/23/09, 02:52 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Frozen in Michigan
Posts: 4,733
combining double wide to stick built?

We have a house on the smaller side and could really use an addition as we have 6 children in a 3 bedroom 1 bathroom home. We do not wish to sell our current home with the current economy and take a loss on equity. We own our home 100% free and clear. We could use more bedrooms and another bathroom. I noticed on craigslist there are a lot of repo'd double and singlewides for low prices.

I was wondering about taking one of those repo'd trailers and attaching it to our current home and making it into an L shape. Course we would need to match the siding so we dont look like total rednecks but I just wondered if there was any reason NOT to do this sort of thing?

I was thinking we could attach it for now and in 20 years when all of our kids (SHOULD) be gone, we can remove it and go back to the smaller home/dwelling which would work great. Our septic is large enough to already handle another bathroom. Our lot is wide enough to handle it within the offset restrictions or whatever it is called. the cost of a doublewide would be less than all the taxes/closing costs plus moving cost it would take to sell our home and move somewhere else. It seems the more frugal option. It would be cheaper than frame building an addition with an additional 2-3 bedrooms and bathroom.

Anyways. Has anyone done this before? regret or grateful? anything I should keep in mind?

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  #2  
Old 05/23/09, 02:54 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Frozen in Michigan
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btw, we would have the ability to do this without borrowing money but it would be using our savings...

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  #3  
Old 05/23/09, 02:58 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: KY
Posts: 11,416

I've never done this but can appreciate your need for extra space. I'd check first on any zoning restrictions. That might stop you right there. Also, increase in square footage will add to your property tax, home insurance, etc.

Good luck!

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  #4  
Old 05/23/09, 03:10 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington
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I see this around here all the time, more with singlewides than with double.

From what I've seen, it can be done and it can be done so it looks nice, but I always wonder what they do with the extra kitchen.....if they turn it into a different room (den? family room?) or what.

Janis

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  #5  
Old 05/23/09, 03:13 PM
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One thing to bear in mind is that trailers are mostly built with 7' ceilings rather than the standard 8' a house is built on.

It might be cheaper to stick build. I would price it out first.

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  #6  
Old 05/23/09, 03:18 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Frozen in Michigan
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i thought about zoning. if i look around me, I live in a township full of scabbed together trailers usually from the trailer first and added on a stick framed addition. I'd just be doing it the other way around :P It is a highly agricultural area with a lot of migrant workers which has a lot of umm interesting home sets up too. So unless it was recent zoning changes- I think that will be okay there. I know it will cost for inspections and permit to move it here. PLus the cost of moving it here.

I'd think it would be a lower increase for prop value since it would be a trailer wouldn't it? (compared to stick built addition)

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  #7  
Old 05/23/09, 03:25 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Frozen in Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deaconjim View Post
One thing to bear in mind is that trailers are mostly built with 7' ceilings rather than the standard 8' a house is built on.

It might be cheaper to stick build. I would price it out first.
for a 10-15 yr old double wide with 2200-2400 sq feet it averages 20K or best offer. A few of them were 12K-15K. This is for 2000+ feet ones with 4 bedrooms 2 bath. For the 900-1000 singlewides they averaged 10K OBO. They are repo'd ones and the bank wants money out of them!

I should keep in mind to check the ceiling height on them...


As for the extra kitchen... I have been thinking of that. I'd remodel one of them into a big living room and turn the other one into a kitchen seperate from dining room. Right now our dining room is in the kitchen and its only 14x14. I really want a seperate dining room! I have wanted to turn my living room into a dining room but then i'd have no living room LOL. Our home currently is 1040sq so theres not much room to do much.
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  #8  
Old 05/23/09, 03:25 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 6,980

Here you could do it easy not have to ask anyone . You can find single wides from free to whatever you could stand . From what i've read about most of Mi i bet you would need a wheelbarrow to carry the paper work an permit money around in Maybe one those new duel wheel ones .

Could sit it a few feet away an connect with a breeze way enclosed or down south dog trot Find a empty office trailer fix it to match the house but leave the axles hanging under it may still be called portable less tax ??

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  #9  
Old 05/23/09, 05:32 PM
 
Join Date: May 2002
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I've seen it done many times in eastern Colorado. I'll try to get a picture of a couple of finished ones for you. I'd say go for it. If you have the money, it will cost you less to build (although might raise your taxes when the next assessment is done). I've seen some with the stick built house in back, some with the mobile on the side, just whatever you want to do. One house even had a long turkey or chicken coop tied into the house and it actually looks quite nice now! Only those of us who've lived here a long time know what it used to be!
Jan in Co

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  #10  
Old 05/23/09, 06:09 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Michigan's thumb
Posts: 13,762

You can do it. I'd be concerned about the connection, have it done properly. I'd also put the trailer on a permanent foundation; it will add years of life to the trailer, especially since you have kids. If you don't already have a basement, you can put the trailer on a basement foundation and have yourself a nice storage area. You can use the extra kitchen for canning and that sort of thing. The living room can become a dining room or kid's play room or computer room. Gosh, think of all the extra space you'll have! Yes, your assessment will go up, but not nearly as much as if you'd put a stick built addition on.

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  #11  
Old 05/23/09, 09:58 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: KY
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Around here, if it's attached to the primary residence and is under roof, then it's additional and taxable square footage. However, in some locations the additional property tax might not be a big expense? I don't know.

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  #12  
Old 05/24/09, 08:06 AM
 
Join Date: May 2002
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deaconjim View Post
One thing to bear in mind is that trailers are mostly built with 7' ceilings rather than the standard 8' a house is built on.

It might be cheaper to stick build. I would price it out first.

I wonder if you could build a short breezeway between the two and not have to deal with ceiling heights and you would not get wet going between the two. If it's only a few feet, it wouldn't be bad and you could plant all kinds of pretty flowering vines on trellises.

Later, when the kids are grown, you may still want room for them to visit. You never know where they will settle.
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  #13  
Old 05/24/09, 08:44 AM
Brenda Groth
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
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i have a friend that has done that twice..and there are neighbors here that have combined ..you must first check with your zoning ordinances..and see if they'll make you drop your idea..if not..then the most important thing is to match up your foundations..so that there isn't movement..and you can put a "hallway" between the two so as not to damage the original structure..my girlfriend had a double wide and a single wide..she fastened them together at the living room/family room area..with an opening that was framed in..quite large..it was so cool as they had two kitchens..4 baths and 6 bedrooms !! they put a wood burning stove in the space between the two where there was the large opening and that nearly heated the entire thing..with a bit of propane back up ..as the bedrooms didn't need as much heat..of course.

across the street from us is a single wide where they opened the living room wall and put an addition on to it..the full width of the living room ..square..and then a deck off of that..but it wasn't bedrooms.

down the road from us people took a single wide housetrailer ..and the built a pole barn around all but one little end sticking out..the pole barn is 2 story and is mostly bed and bath..and covers 80 % of the house trailer completely..it has 8 bedrooms.

so yeah it can be done and it will work great for you if your county will allow it..just takes some real planning..i wouldnt' mind adding on to this place but don't have anywhere to go with an addition..and there are only two of us..guess we really have enough room...one can always want more.

check out the mobile home thread on www.gardenweb.com

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  #14  
Old 05/24/09, 08:49 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Pawnee Nation, OK
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Just keep in mind that adding a manufactured home to your stick built may not only DECREASE the market value of your house, but if you ever need to finance the property (you never know when an emergency strikes) you may fid it hard, if not impossible, to find a lender.

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  #15  
Old 05/24/09, 05:00 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 2,673

You will also have 2 water heaters, 2 furnaces, etc..... Utilities will be double. Build on to your current home out of pocket. Then you will actually have a home in 20 years.

If your heater is over 5-7 years old, get a new one that uses less fuel.

6 kids in a 3 BR house is not too bad.

I had a double wide. It won't happen again.

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