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  #21  
Old 01/07/10, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by southerngurl View Post
I get cracked up at all the people around here with blankets on their horses. Oh no, it's 20 degrees, I better put a blanket on fluffy!
We blanketed the Appy when he came as he was always kept in a stall and had NO winter coat to speak of. He came with a slick pretty summer coat. So, he got an insulated winter coat and still if he's in the wind, even with the coat, he stands there and shakes all over. The Thoroughbred gets a coat. The QH doesn't and the Arabian doesn't. My son's paint came wearing a sheet and we leave that on him. No insulating particularly, but does break the wind.

DixyDoodle: Our Thoroughbred does the same thing and I did think about that. They're doing fine taking turns inside the shed. 2 will go out to hay and 2 will stay by the shed, then they switch. I think they're doing ok so far. It's a relatively small area by the shed and we don't need any big fights right there. Too easy for someone to get hurt.
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  #22  
Old 01/07/10, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by shanzone2001 View Post
You would definitely laugh at me...I worry at 30 degrees!
I only worry below 20 and down in the single digits and below zero if the wind is blowing. We are wide open on the north and that wind comes across here with absolutely nothing to break it and it comes across strong and with the snow on the ground it just makes it that much colder. Today the wind is around 30mph with gusts over 40. Fun fun. Plus we have frozen water lines that we're trying to thaw.
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  #23  
Old 01/07/10, 12:02 PM
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Everything is relative. Thinner skinnned horses can do just fine in very cold conditions but they need time to adapt. My horses can survive very well in brutal conditions (we've been known to have -40C and colder) without blankets. I think our chinooks are harder on livestock than the actual cold. When a Chinook rolls in our temps can by double digits in an hour or so.

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  #24  
Old 01/07/10, 12:22 PM
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If I have a horse that is old (like my 30 year old gelding) or doesn't grow a thick hair coat and is shivering in whatever conditions, I put a waterproof rug on them. They stop shivering, they keep weight on, and everyones happy.
I take it on a horse by horse basis. However, I do have a blanket for every horse in case of sickness or special circumstance.

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  #25  
Old 01/07/10, 12:39 PM
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generally as long as horeses aren't wet..as in cold rain they can do quite well in really cold weather. Its the cold rains I hate. We used to ride at -40 below zero in MN. My horses all wintered fine in cold northern temps. They'd put their butts to the wind and do just fine. Extra HAY and if you can some warmed water and you are set to go.

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  #26  
Old 01/07/10, 12:55 PM
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Oh I know some horses need it, especially to keep weight on. But a field with 4 quarter horse types that look perfectly healthy, probably not

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  #27  
Old 01/07/10, 01:51 PM
 
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just a note on that tank heater you thought was shocking your horse , it probably was ! When they go bad they will shock and you won't feel it in your hand dipped in water , you have rubber soles on , try it barefoot and stick your tongue in the trough , bet you get a jolt ! Try a new heater !

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  #28  
Old 01/07/10, 02:29 PM
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I have Thoroughbreds, and they appreciate their "blankies"
My one freeloader horse came to me about 300 pounds underweight, thin skinned and with almost no coat despite it being the middle of January and COLD. The friend who brought him to me had him in a large field without so much as a run-in shed, and she wasn't blanketing him. Thoroughbreds use alot of calories anyways, but when it's cold anything I can do to minimize their need to expend lots of calories trying to stay warm is helpful. I'm sure that a big part of why the poor horse was so dang skinny when I got him is that he will shiver miserably if there's hard and chilly wind. When he came to me, the very first thing I did was throw a waterproof, insulated rug on him. He was freezing cold when it was in the high 30's out.
Maybe it's all these years of caring for sensitive Thoroughbreds, but I find it quite pleasing to see a pasture full of healthy happy horses with blankets on

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  #29  
Old 01/07/10, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by kscowboy View Post
just a note on that tank heater you thought was shocking your horse , it probably was ! When they go bad they will shock and you won't feel it in your hand dipped in water , you have rubber soles on , try it barefoot and stick your tongue in the trough , bet you get a jolt ! Try a new heater !
Is that my post you're responding to?
If so...
That would makes sense, but it was brand new out of the box!
Sold it 3 days later on ebay for just short of what I paid for it.
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  #30  
Old 01/07/10, 07:34 PM
 
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yep I've had two older ones do that in the past year , watch the horses get jolted and go over and i can't feel a thing. Poor guys wouldn't go near the tank for a day or two until they saw all the others drinking. I had a bad one right out of the box this season , worked for a couple days and quit so i guess new ones can go out too.

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  #31  
Old 01/07/10, 08:13 PM
 
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ya some stuff is junk right out of the box its with that for almost every thing you buy i got an electric fence one time and i hooked it all up right and i seen one of my cows licking it so i touched it nothing the light was on and every thing grounded with 3 ground rods like it said took it back and said it was junk and it didnt work got another one and seen that same cow lick it and fall to the ground so that one worked

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  #32  
Old 01/07/10, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bigmudder77 View Post
ya some stuff is junk right out of the box its with that for almost every thing you buy i got an electric fence one time and i hooked it all up right and i seen one of my cows licking it so i touched it nothing the light was on and every thing grounded with 3 ground rods like it said took it back and said it was junk and it didnt work got another one and seen that same cow lick it and fall to the ground so that one worked

I had to chuckle at that one!! LOL
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  #33  
Old 01/09/10, 07:03 AM
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We ground our water trough that has the heater in it. Supposedly some horses can feel the current in the water and won't touch it. I just have a metal rod driven into the ground, and screw a copper wire to it and have the wire in the water (right to the bottom).

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  #34  
Old 01/09/10, 07:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaInN.Idaho View Post
If I have a horse that is old (like my 30 year old gelding) or doesn't grow a thick hair coat and is shivering in whatever conditions, I put a waterproof rug on them. They stop shivering, they keep weight on, and everyones happy.
I take it on a horse by horse basis. However, I do have a blanket for every horse in case of sickness or special circumstance.

What she said. Yup yup yup. Or if I get The Look, like Sid gave us the other day. My old Arab however will actually shiver. I know shivering is his body's way of warming, but he shivers in a Spring rain, so I just don't think he is personally adapted very well for the cold. He is my smart boy, though...stands still for his blanket, sees us in summer and walks right up with his head down for his fly mask...with age CAN come wisdom!

Anyhow, a horse who is young and healthy should be able to maintain to some pretty ridiculously cold temps with good hay to eat. But when there are extremes (high winds, precipitation with winds, for instance, single digit degrees) I just go ahead and blanket them. Remember, I live in a more temperate state so we don't as a rule deal with a lot of super cold, but when we do, it sneaks out of nowhere, lasts for a day or two, warms back up, then snaps again. This winter had me concerned as we went form like 40 degrees down to 9 with a wind chill in the space of a day, they just weren't ready for that one.
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  #35  
Old 01/09/10, 01:10 PM
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I have been blanketing the freeloader horse I mentioned above for weeks now, but yesterday he was even shivering under his medium weight waterproof blanket It didn't get above freezing at all yesterday and there was some wind, too. I ended up having to swap his medium weight blanket out for the heavyweight Weatherbeater that you see advertised in catalogs with horses that are running around in the snow. My older TB is doing just fine is his medium weight blanket, so it really does vary from individual to individual.

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