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  #1  
Old 11/16/05, 12:54 PM
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Round duct work hot air registers?

For some reason toasty warm downstairs this morning (fire in woodstove) and cold upstairs. In past usually not this much difference though upstairs can get real chilly when it gets down in single digits. Had always kicked myself for not building in couple controllable ducts to get more heat upstairs. Figure its time. Simplest way would be to cut couple eight inch diameter round holes in floor and downstairs ceiling and slip in some 8" duct pipe. However I have never seen any round hot air floor registers. In forced hot air systems they always use those adapters to go from round duct to small rectangular register opening. Plus being this isnt forced air, would like max opening which would be round.

Anybody ever see round hot air registers to put in floor? Ones that I can close if I want? I suppose I could cut and weld and make custom ones, but for effort involved, be easier to cut rectangular holes and custom bend rectangular ducts and use stock rectangular registers. Need more of them since modern forced air registers seem to be rather small..

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  #2  
Old 11/16/05, 02:33 PM
 
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you will most likely end up with rectangular holes, never seem a round one you need some big grates depending upon upstair squae footage.

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  #3  
Old 11/16/05, 02:55 PM
 
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You could also use a transition piece, for example, it goes from a 9x12 register size to an 8" round duct size, it is called a register pan made by Lukjan. www.lukjan.com You can also try www.hartandcooley.com . Hope that helps.

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  #4  
Old 11/16/05, 02:58 PM
 
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I just thought of something else, I use the old round cast iron registers to allow heat upstairs, if you can find them you should be able to attach duct to them. Check for the round registers w/ dampers in any place that sells old house hardware

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  #5  
Old 11/16/05, 03:09 PM
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Some heat just radiates up through the uninsulated upstairs floor. Some from the chimney that passes through the upstairs on its way up through the roof. Yes one big old timey cast iron grate right over woodstove would do it, but first not easy to find anymore and second more work to install. Both downstairs heated room and upstairs room are 12x14. I dont heat the backroom. Its a small house. I think even a couple eight inch ducts from over the woodstove would work. Hmm, how about a round sewer drain plate with bunch holes? Anybody seen those in about an 8inch diameter. I'm sure they are offered somewhere in some industrial supply catalog. I could come up with some way to block them if necessary. Even just laying something over the grate if I needed to close it off. Suppose I could make my own, but hate to think of drilling all those holes. Probably cheapest way though.

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  #6  
Old 11/16/05, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beowoulf90
I just thought of something else, I use the old round cast iron registers to allow heat upstairs, if you can find them you should be able to attach duct to them. Check for the round registers w/ dampers in any place that sells old house hardware
I've never seen round ones, just the square old timey cast iron registers. If they exist at a halfway reasonable price that would be great. Wild guess that anything "antique" is priced for yuppies restoring old mansions. Thanks for the suggestion, I will look around.
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  #7  
Old 11/16/05, 06:59 PM
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Many older homes got by very well without ducts and forced air. A floor grate in each second story room provided adequate circulation simply because of natural convection. Return air usually went down the stairwell.

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Old 11/16/05, 08:28 PM
 
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......................john , I'd have your local tin shop fabricate a couple of round tin outlets that work on the same principle as the lid on a "Parmisian cheese" container . To balance the air flow between rooms you'd just have to partially open or close the sliding part of the "duct" . fordy...

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  #9  
Old 11/16/05, 09:22 PM
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This may sound a bit bizarre, but what if you were to install the smallest bathroom exhaust fan you could find in the ceiling of the room with the stove - then run the fans exhaust up into one of the upstairs walls (nearest the floor) via flexible dryer vent pipe. I believe the exterior wall exhaust vents with the little flaps could be used as a wall outlet register - control it all via thermostat.

If you try this, make sure it is safe and you're not preventing the woodstove from operating properly... I know nothing of woodstoves.

Just thinking out loud.

cheers,

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  #10  
Old 11/16/05, 09:29 PM
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I did something I didnt realize was dumb till I finished. When I was almost done runing my duct work I ran out of square ducting so I just installed my last run with 8" round pipe, lol now I am going to have to make a round register to cover the hole round hole in the floor. A piece of small angle iron,(3/4"x3/4") cut some slots in it so I can bend it, and weld some expanded metal over it. It wont be pretty but it'll cover th ehole

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  #11  
Old 11/16/05, 10:04 PM
 
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You should be able to find a round to square converter at home depot. When I helped my buddy doing HVAC i looks like a vacuum hear with square at the front and round at the back I've seen them in the big box stores

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  #12  
Old 11/16/05, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fernando
Many older homes got by very well without ducts and forced air. A floor grate in each second story room provided adequate circulation simply because of natural convection. Return air usually went down the stairwell.
Er, um, not wanting forced air, just vent(s) in ceiling over stove for hot air to find its way upstairs. Upstairs floor joists are I-beam trusses about foot tall. Subfloor and floor on trusses, drywall for downstairs ceiling on bottom of trusses. Need a heavy grate of some kind upstairs to keep chair legs and my legs from finding their way into the holes. I was just thinking if I could use round duct pipe, it would be relaticely simple to cut couple holes in floor/ceiling and be done with minimal fuss and mess. Just plop a round grate on top of the round hole. Large rectangular grate which I'd also have to go find would require framing to support it and custom sheet metal duct to line the hole.

I did find antique round register grates online and ebay even. Kinda pricey at $25 and up, mostly up. But sure they'd be higher if available new at Lowes. Still thinking make my own out of quarter inch boiler plate with bunch holes drilled in it. Could add sheet metal circle under such a homemade grate also with same holes, so it could be offset like person suggesting parmesan chees shaker immitation to shut the vent.. Think some more as I have lived with this for years. Just seemed big temp difference this year and only dipped down into 20s. Single digit temps would make quite bigger difference.
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Last edited by HermitJohn; 11/16/05 at 10:27 PM.
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  #13  
Old 11/17/05, 08:25 AM
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You may have no alternative other than searching for suitable floor grating. If I recall correctly, those older homes that relied on natural circulation used floor grates that were quite large - perhaps 18 inches square. Grating that might be suitable for your purposes might be found at scrap yards that deal with junked heavy equipment since they contain many platforms, landings or steps that are usually open grate material and those scrap yards usually sell material like that by the pound. Of course you would have to frame in the grate you use no matter what shape or size but I don't know why you seem to be concerned with providing the grate with some sort of cover. Seems to be it could be left open year-round without any problem. Hint - if you are relying on the stairwell to serve as a return for the circulation pattern you might consider mounting a ceiling fan directly above the stairwell itself.
Good luck !

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  #14  
Old 11/17/05, 10:56 AM
 
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There are absolutely round air ducts. We have them in our downstairs ceiling. There is a cap that fits over the end and it rotates on a threaded bolt so that it can open and close to whatever degree you want. The only problem I can think of is that they do not fit completely flush. On the floor upstairs, you would have to put them in a place that didn't get any traffic. Not sure where to get them, but I would imagine any big home improvement store would have them.

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  #15  
Old 11/17/05, 11:01 AM
 
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Another thought just hit me because I am in the exact same boat with our house. Is it entirely necessary to do any ducting at all? The space between the joists are sealed. Cutting a hole in the ceiling and a hole in the floor should work fine, shouldn't it? It would just take a little longer to heat the larger space between the joists and however long the run is, but a wood stove is running for hours or days or weeks at a time anyway so what's the hurry? Just a thought.

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  #16  
Old 11/17/05, 01:37 PM
 
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If you have central air just turn your fan on it will circulate the air throughout the building.

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  #17  
Old 11/18/05, 01:36 PM
 
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Put your round holes in your ceiling and cover them with a stamped grill that sits flush on the ceiling. You can put a damper in the duct if need be. If youll be walking on the floor where the duct comes out , use a floor grate like you see on a floor furnace.

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  #18  
Old 11/18/05, 01:56 PM
 
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If you buy a pair of matching cold air return grates, they will fit over a square hole between your joists which are likely 16 inches on center. Put one in the ceilng and the other on the top of the hole upstairs. You could easily line the space between the joists with a piece of metal flashing. If you can't find grates with shut off fins you could put a throw rug over it when you didn't want it working.
You can spray paint the ceiling grate to a color you like. The square hole won't leave the ends of flooring boards without joists under them.

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