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  #1  
Old 06/29/12, 09:54 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: western NY
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cabin for under $10,000?

I am considering a piece of property to have a cabin built on. Is it realistic to build a year-round, insulated cabin around 700 square feet - one bedroom, small kitchen and bath for under 10K?

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  #2  
Old 06/29/12, 11:47 AM
 
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Location: Illinois
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If you include septic system and a well for water, you probably can't unless you do work yourself and find cheap(low cost) building materials.

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  #3  
Old 06/29/12, 02:21 PM
 
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Our well cost $10,000 and that didn't include the pump or pipes.

Our cabin is 720 sq ft on the main floor with a loft about half that size. Just the materials came to a lot more than $10,000.

If you don't have to build to code and put up with inspections and such you may get the cost down.

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  #4  
Old 06/29/12, 02:45 PM
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Used single wide mobile cheapest per square foot you are going to find. Many places will pay you to take them since mobile home courts dont want them and govts now ban them. You cant buy conventional construction materials to build house cheaper. You might dry in a concrete block shell for money you have if you do all labor. People have, for decades, built concrete block basements and just put roof over them to live in until they had money. Lot easier to heat than above ground block buildings. Or metal prefab building. Now if you have loads of time and native materials like logs and stone, and you do all labor, sure. People have built homes from native materials and sweat labor for eons. Without any cash!

Wells vary greatly in cost depending where and how deep. You can get kits and drill your own, most likely need well to be under 100 foot to make it practical. Going deeper pretty much requires a professional with professional equipment. or if you find water fairly shallow, you can hand dig a well or drive a sand point.....

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  #5  
Old 06/29/12, 03:09 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
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It costs me about $16,000 to build 400 sq ft. with heat, hot water, bathroom and electrical. Built on concrete foundation. I reuse what I can and buy closouts. I do all the work myself except my Nephew helps me set the trusses and lay sheathing and he does the roofing....James

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  #6  
Old 06/29/12, 11:09 PM
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I think your question has a lot of variables. If you have most of the building materials on the property and want to build a plain home without central heat and air and a hot tub in the bathroom I think it can be done. (Especially if you're willing to rummage and look for items to be recycled)

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  #7  
Old 06/30/12, 12:12 AM
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I built my 16x16' cabin for around under $2000. That included most of the materials for a 12x16 addition. No wiring or plumbing, no well. I bought most of the lumber at the hardwood tie mill I where I worked.

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  #8  
Old 06/30/12, 05:55 AM
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I built the 16X24 main cabin in 2003 for $800. I used alot of salvage materials from a house I tore down. I am now at 860 sq.ft and about $25,000.

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  #9  
Old 07/01/12, 10:51 AM
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I am currently building a 16x18 earthbag building, I'll give you total price when done

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  #10  
Old 07/01/12, 11:33 AM
 
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I agree...lots of variables.

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  #11  
Old 07/04/12, 09:32 AM
 
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Location: north central Pennsylvania
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Ever consider putting up a ..Yurt...Granddaughter is looking forward to getting hers.. I think they are a wonderful home and since you don't need a foundation you can consider them without a permit and inspections. Look into them...

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  #12  
Old 07/04/12, 02:02 PM
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Cost of cabin....

I am interested in this as well...i have been on a home improvments store website, and placing lumber in cart to see how it adds up...i am building a 20x30 cabin (minimum sq ft allowed) and need to keep it as cheap as possible. I am considering building on concrete piers, poured by myself, as a pad would probably run $2000.00 by itself. I have bought a generator, small air compressor, and a framing nail gun, as i am building this by myself. My land is located at 10,000 ft, and having ANYTHING done is expensive, as i am not close to any good size town......but i am considering doing the form myself IF i go with a floating slab.....A whole lot of options!!!!!!!! Iv'e already invested almost $10,000 in a solar system, less batteries, which i'll buy when i'm ready to move on to the place.....so far, just lumber for base, walls, and part of roofing is at $2500.00 i thought it would be higher, but it does not include any windows, doors, elec, or inside finish.......rsbhunter

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  #13  
Old 07/05/12, 07:58 AM
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rsbhunter, is it legal to build on treated posts in your area? I used CCA treated posts for my foundation. Its 6X6's set in the ground with built up girders on top. Then just frame the floor as normal on top of them. I used treated lumber for my floor joists also. I insulated the floor with R13 then covered that with house wrap. I then used treated fence boards for skirting in a board and batten patttern. Its has worked fine for me with no settling to date. I was able to do this without any outside help. A neighbor kindly dug the post holes with his fence post auger, they are set 4' deep on a quick-crete footing then back filled with gravel to keep water away from the post.

Lowes has decently priced stock windows.

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  #14  
Old 07/05/12, 06:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HermitJohn View Post
Used single wide mobile cheapest per square foot you are going to find. Many places will pay you to take them since mobile home courts dont want them and govts now ban them. You cant buy conventional construction materials to build house cheaper. You might dry in a concrete block shell for money you have if you do all labor. People have, for decades, built concrete block basements and just put roof over them to live in until they had money. Lot easier to heat than above ground block buildings. Or metal prefab building. Now if you have loads of time and native materials like logs and stone, and you do all labor, sure. People have built homes from native materials and sweat labor for eons. Without any cash!

Wells vary greatly in cost depending where and how deep. You can get kits and drill your own, most likely need well to be under 100 foot to make it practical. Going deeper pretty much requires a professional with professional equipment. or if you find water fairly shallow, you can hand dig a well or drive a sand point.....
Hard to beat for cheap living,,
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  #15  
Old 07/17/12, 07:22 PM
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Check out the store called "Restore" run by "Habitat for Humanity", they sell leftover/extra/unneeded household goods & building materials for between 5~20¢ on the dollar. Everything basically brand new good quality stuff & the profits go to support "Habitat for Humanity" (they build housing for people in need, they're a good group). Yeah you need to be flexible, building around finds & you don't know what will be in stock at that point but for the price its certainly worth any extra hassle. Originally I was going to buy most of my purchased goods from them but I can't now. Still that does not mean you can't use the resource.

Adamb

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  #16  
Old 07/18/12, 10:11 PM
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Also, check out Home - Simple Solar Homesteading

He has a book about how he built his cabin and a video walk through of the cabin as well. It was built for $2000.

You can cut the water cost by capturing rain water, and depending on your water usage (cut back on those frivolous things like long showers and high flush toilets) you can dispense with a well, depending on the rainfall in your area and the square footage of your catchment system.
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  #17  
Old 09/02/12, 10:29 PM
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I looked at a few yurts they seem nice but don't know how durable they are in the long run.

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  #18  
Old 09/02/12, 11:29 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc66 View Post
How to build a 14x14 solar cabin - YouTube

Also, check out Home - Simple Solar Homesteading

He has a book about how he built his cabin and a video walk through of the cabin as well. It was built for $2000.

You can cut the water cost by capturing rain water, and depending on your water usage (cut back on those frivolous things like long showers and high flush toilets) you can dispense with a well, depending on the rainfall in your area and the square footage of your catchment system.
He was talking about 700 square foot cabin and this is only 196 s.f. So if he is building a 196 sf cabin for $2000 then a 700 sf house would cost roughly $7150.
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  #19  
Old 09/03/12, 08:53 AM
 
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You could get the shell and slab foundation done for that. But wiring and plumbing - no . Im not even considering the cost of a well and septic, just the plumbing and wiring inside the house. That stuff aint cheap. Been there and done that. We built a 768 square ft house and have lots more than that in it. Also we did it 17 years ago before the increased costs hit copper and cement among other things.

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  #20  
Old 09/04/12, 11:27 AM
 
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If your code allows it people have built some nice well insulated homes out of straw bales and cob. We have some commercial buildings in the area built from those 400 lb bales. They get most of their heat from solar collectors.

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