Tomato from cuttings - Homesteading Today
Homesteading Today

Go Back   Homesteading Today > Country Living Forums > Gardening & Plant Propagation


Like Tree9Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 07/18/12, 08:15 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 312
Tomato from cuttings

Anyone ever done this with a favorite Tomato plant? I bought a few romas from lowes this year and one is 3 times the size of the others and the fruits are twice as big as I am getting off of the others. It is a hybrid so I cant save seed from it but though I could take cuttings and over the winter make as many as I will need for next year and just grow out that one type of roma.
How long could you keep a plant like that going? Years? I have to bring it in in the winter, would it do ok in a south facing window or do I need a light?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07/18/12, 08:38 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 736

Theoretically, forever, assuming you don't screw up somewhere. You can take cuttings just before your first expected frost and let them root in water. In two-three weeks the cutting will have produced enough roots to pot in soil.

Your potted cutting will be long and gangly overwintering without much light. You can bring them outside to harden off on warmer winter days so they can get some full sunlight.

lurnin2farm likes this.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07/18/12, 09:31 AM
chickenista's Avatar
Original recipe!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: NC foothills
Posts: 13,657

Yep... I do this every year. (for the most part)
It will either need a light, or you will have to be very vigilant in your care of the cuttings.

__________________
http://www.thehennery.blogspot.com -
the farm blog
http://thehennerytraditionals.blogspot.com/ -
the herbal blog + shop
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07/18/12, 09:47 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Idaho
Posts: 2,963

Where do you take cuttings from? The branches? How long or how much of the cutting should there be?

__________________

Last edited by whodunit; 07/18/12 at 10:02 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07/18/12, 11:12 AM
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: maine
Posts: 2,324

Find a nice "sucker" about 4-6" long. Cut off with razor. Stick in wet sterile media. Place in "bright" shade. Move into partial sun after about a week. Increase sun after a couple days. If wilts up back up in the sun exposure. (or water)

Once you have your stringy plant inside you can prune it back leaving a lateral as a new leader. Plenty of work in a far N climate.

Raven12 likes this.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07/18/12, 11:17 AM
chickenista's Avatar
Original recipe!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: NC foothills
Posts: 13,657

We grow a 'mother' plant over the winter and take cuttings from it to root out for spring. Beats the heck out of starting seeds.
Though I still start seeds if I want to try a new variety.

__________________
http://www.thehennery.blogspot.com -
the farm blog
http://thehennerytraditionals.blogspot.com/ -
the herbal blog + shop
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07/18/12, 03:04 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,853

Dumb question: Can this be done with a pepper plant?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07/18/12, 03:13 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 312

How big does your mother plant get Chickenista? How many cuttings can you take off of her by spring?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07/18/12, 03:52 PM
chickenista's Avatar
Original recipe!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: NC foothills
Posts: 13,657

Sigh.. they can get impressively large. I try to keep good light on them so they don't feel the need to stretch out.
And you can get a whole bunch.. especially if you are going to completely cannibalize the mothers.
You can just keep cutting down the length of the vine and as long as you have a set of leaves on the part you are rooting, you can take the mothers all the way to the ground.
Or you can take one set of cuttings and let them grown and them cut them in half or take more cuttings from them etc...
Tomatoes are VERY forgiving and easy to root...

lurnin2farm likes this.
__________________
http://www.thehennery.blogspot.com -
the farm blog
http://thehennerytraditionals.blogspot.com/ -
the herbal blog + shop
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07/18/12, 04:43 PM
NickieL's Avatar  
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lake Station
Posts: 14,759

this year I took off some early suckers from the ones outside and I stuck em in the ground, they are doing just fine with only a tad extra water then the parents (we are in a drought after all) to get them going.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 07/18/12, 04:57 PM
Realist
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 8,359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven12 View Post
Dumb question: Can this be done with a pepper plant?
Yes it can. As I understand it, "cloned" pepper plants are more likely to survive than potted up seeds. I rarely have a tomato seed that doesn't germinate, but my germination rate for peppers is horrible.

I found a link for you, too.
How to Clone Pepper Plants | Garden Guides
Tommyice likes this.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07/18/12, 10:05 PM
Plotting My Escape
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Williamsport, PA
Posts: 650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven12 View Post
Dumb question: Can this be done with a pepper plant?
I remember reading somewhere that peppers are actually perrenials and that given the right conditions don't die. They even showed a pepper "bush" that was several years old.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07/18/12, 10:48 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Indiana
Posts: 48

Pepper plants grown in a pot or warmer climate can and do grow year round.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07/18/12, 11:03 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 2,853

Thanks.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07/20/12, 09:10 PM
How Do I's Avatar
In the Garden or Garage
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,139

I usually take my tomato cuttings, pot them up and move them to the shade to root. This year, right at the beginning of the drought, I was pruning some suckers off of the tomato plants and decided to just stick them right into the row. I wasn't too worried about losing any.

We had nothing but heat from then on. Those little guys flopped over for several days at high noon and bounced right back every evening with a good watering. Every single one of them are now several feet tall covered with tomatoes. You can't beat free plants or free food for that matter.

__________________

My How To blog - Happy Homesteading!

Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07/24/12, 10:48 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,826

I bought a "Patio" tomato at Lowe's last year for the express purpose of trying to clone plants that might produce tomatoes over the winter in our south-facing windows. I took suckers as previously described and stuck them into new potting mix filled cups that had drainage holes drilled into them. I kept those in a clear plastic container to maintain moisture. When they struck roots, I potted them into 2-3 gal pots and used some el cheapo tomato cages to hold them upright when they got leggy. Occasionally I'd shake them to mimic the wind blowing to help pollination and while we didn't have tomatoes every night, the ones we did get beat what was available at the grocery all to pieces. This spring, I started a new batch of suckers to raise outdoors in pots as soon as the weather allowed in hopes they would start producing before the garden tomatoes. I wasn't disappointed.

lurnin2farm likes this.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07/24/12, 01:27 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 246

I just learned something new, so let me get this straight, because I want to try it!

So you basically take the suckers from a tomato plant (which I prune all the time but up to now I threw them away), and stick them in a small pot so they can develop roots, and keep inside for the winter and then transplant in the garden the following year? Is that it? How tall does it get during the winter? Just asking so I know how big of pots I should start collecting.

Ifi

__________________
www.hearttocraft.com

http://www.etsy.com/shop/ifistav

www.facebook.com/handmadecardsbyIfi
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07/25/12, 03:50 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ifistav View Post
I just learned something new, so let me get this straight, because I want to try it!

So you basically take the suckers from a tomato plant (which I prune all the time but up to now I threw them away), and stick them in a small pot so they can develop roots, and keep inside for the winter and then transplant in the garden the following year? Is that it? How tall does it get during the winter? Just asking so I know how big of pots I should start collecting.

Ifi
I think the plants will flower and produce tomatos in the winter so you will need to take cuts during the winter to use for spring planting. I dont know if there's a way to keep them from producing fruit in the winter. Maybe keep a light on them?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07/25/12, 12:47 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ottawa Valley
Posts: 244

This wont work if you try it using a determinate tho, correct?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07/25/12, 02:32 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,826

Quote Ifistav:
"and keep inside for the winter and then transplant in the garden the following year? Is that it? How tall does it get during the winter?"

Even a small tomato like the Patio got pretty leggy, like maybe the height of the cage then flopped over to a total of 4'. By the end of winter, they were far too large to try to transplant outdoors. Starting in late March, I started taking cuttings to root and they stayed small until I moved them outside to a protected spot in late April/early May. Those are still small outdoors, about 15" high as it's bred to produce in a container. I think mine are in 2-3 gal pots.

Lurnin2farm said:
"I think the plants will flower and produce tomatos in the winter so you will need to take cuts during the winter to use for spring planting. I dont know if there's a way to keep them from producing fruit in the winter. Maybe keep a light on them?"


I took my cuttings in late winter/early spring but haven't messed with planting the Patio tomatoes in the open ground, always grew them in a container. I have kept regular tomato varieties alive in the house over winter because I had lost the seed them. Successfully cloned new plants the next spring that I did plant in the open garden. As far as getting them to produce fruit, either shake the plants before the buds open or are just barely open to facilitate pollination. I didn't provide any extra light, just from that south facing window.

akaRach asked:
"This wont work if you try it using a determinate tho, correct?"

Nope, it works just fine with both determinate or indeterminate plant. Both will require some support but the indeterminate will require more.

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:08 AM.