Brussel sprout leaves - remove?? - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 06/30/06, 07:36 AM
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Brussel sprout leaves - remove??

Good morning. Am I supposed to remove the leaves of the brussel sprouts plants once the sprouts start to form? Thanks!

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  #2  
Old 06/30/06, 08:28 AM
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The leaves are the factory of plants that convert sunlight, water, and oxygen from the roots into nutrients for the plant to grow. The more leaves, the more growth. If the bottom leaves are yellowing, remove them. We always take brussels out of the ground in the fall and hang them upside down in a shed. Pick them as needed off the stem.

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Old 06/30/06, 03:39 PM
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I'm so jealous! I'm trying to grow brussels sprouts for the first time this year and having wretched luck. The germination rate is abysmal; other brassicas from the same seed company did splendidly so maybe this packet just got exposed to heat or something.

Then during the rains while I could barely get out to the garden, one of my two little brussels sprouts got skeletonized. I don't know what's eating it. I looked all around but couldn't find the culprit(s).

Next year for sure!

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  #4  
Old 07/01/06, 08:24 AM
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caterpillars have eaten most of my leaves

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  #5  
Old 07/01/06, 08:49 AM
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Location: North East
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so you just let them grow? mine aren't growing into stalks, but they have a bunch of leaves
I can't do anything with mine theres a huge nest of ants living in that part of the garden.

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  #6  
Old 07/01/06, 09:08 AM
 
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Location: North Carolina
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Best time to grow Brussel Sprouts is in a Fall Garden. They take so long to grow that the heat gets them before they are ready to eat. Heat will cause them to slow down in growth and get bitter. Plus the Cabbage Worms will eat most all of it before it's ready.

Plant them from seed about 10-12 weeks before first frost. They can take a pretty good frost before it affects them, as most Cabbage plants can. This family of plants will always taste better with the cold. Plus, no bugs at that time of the year.

Having grown all varities of plants in this family while I lived in Iowa, about 20 miles east of Council Bluffs, it was nothing to go out scrape the snow off and cut Cabbage, Brussel Sprouts and Collards. Great eating. Now retired to eastern North Carolina. I plant all my cool weather plants Cabbage, Potatoes, Peas, Lettuce and such around 1 Feb. That way all are in before it gets too hot. Replant all around 1 Sept. so I get two crops a year. Summer here is the time for Corn, Melons, Cukes,Beans and Tomatoes. Usually little frost till after Thanksgiving and have fresh veges till after Christmas...

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  #7  
Old 07/01/06, 02:19 PM
 
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If you can baby your spring brussel sprouts through the hot summer (and they will look almost dead) they may produce great guns for you in the fall. Don't give up. Even if they go to seed! Save that seed too.

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  #8  
Old 07/02/06, 05:42 PM
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Just want to add that my brussels sprouts always taste better after a good freeze. I wouldn't even think of picking them before a freeze -- but it's sweet agony waiting for them!

Pony!
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  #9  
Old 07/02/06, 10:18 PM
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I remove the lower leaves as soon as the accompanying sprout begins to form. The purpose behind removing leaves is to get more production. With all of the leaves, much of the energy goes into growing a taller stalk. The most beautiful Brussels sprout plants that I saw growing last year were maintained with a maximum of about 6 leaves. I'm not quite that drastic as I generally leave 10.

Martin

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  #10  
Old 07/03/06, 05:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paquebot
I remove the lower leaves as soon as the accompanying sprout begins to form. The purpose behind removing leaves is to get more production. With all of the leaves, much of the energy goes into growing a taller stalk. The most beautiful Brussels sprout plants that I saw growing last year were maintained with a maximum of about 6 leaves. I'm not quite that drastic as I generally leave 10.

Martin

I grew really nice big brussel sprouts by removing most of the leaves above the forming sprouts once they were about the diameter of a nickel. My sprout plants grew about 18" tall with heavy production. They remind me of little palm trees and the sprouts spiral around upwards. These grew until the 2nd nip of frost for tastiest harvest.
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  #11  
Old 07/03/06, 09:18 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. Those danged worms are starting to work on my leaves too. The plants themselves are about 18" - 20" tall and just beginning to develop sprouts. I'm afraid the heat may get them - I hope not. Had a miserable failure last year - found out too late it was the heat. So what do I do this year? Plant them at the same time (duh). I will definitely try a fall crop later on.

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  #12  
Old 07/03/06, 09:24 AM
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I'm in zone 3a or 3b (varies from year to year), sometimes even close to 4a, so summer hot days are not many here. However, long daylength and generally cooler nights seem to be a nice climate for brassicas and great brussel sprouts. I can plant as late as mid July for an ealy to mid October crop with Oliver or Bubbles seems the best I've tried here. In times of heat stress, I water them and hope for the best. If it's too dry for too long that also makes them suffer and as any other brassicas threaten to finish off or bolt or producs less sprouts. I believe taking down the leaves helps during those stess periods because the plant doesn't have to use so much energy keeping the leaves thriving rather than the good edible sprouts.

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