sewing machine for a nine year old - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 09/25/08, 10:11 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
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sewing machine for a nine year old

so what do i get her? she's hand sewing all kinds of stuff like pillows, hand bags. i told her i would get her one for her birthday, (next month). do i go with the fancy but low quality stuff at walfart or a more quality but simpler (
I'm tight on money with things the way they are now,,,,,,budget) machine?

Thanks

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  #2  
Old 09/25/08, 10:44 PM
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Join Date: May 2002
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consider buying her one she will grow into. I wouldn't buy a wal-mart or target one... they are cheap!

try a used one at a sew-n-vac store.. get out the yellow pages and see who sells used ones.

you will get a great deal on nice but older machines.

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  #3  
Old 09/25/08, 11:04 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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The better quality brands will frequently allow their customers to trade in their old machines for a newer, more expensive machine with more features. The machines that are traded in are frequently reconditioned and sold as "used but reconditioned to factory specs" and are a pretty good buy, sometimes. Such a machine could be a great starter machine for your daughter, and something that she could use for many years to come.

Have you posted on Freecycle about this? Someone might have a sewing machine that's just gathering dust, but they'd love to pass it on to a youngster who would enjoy it.

A low quality machine is not worth trying to use. It will constantly skip and develop bobbin snarls and such. It would be very discouraging for your daughter to try to use such a machine.

Try to get a portable machine. She might be interested in taking classes. I doubt that they have home ec classes in grade school, but she might be able to get into a junior high or high school home ec class, or a craft store class, or even learn from an older person in the neighborhood. I used to visit one of my grandmother's friends frequently, as she and I loved to talk, but even more we loved to do crafts of all sorts. She was about 50 years older than I, but we still loved to visit with each other, and she taught me many things. She had no children of her own, and she was glad to pass on what she'd learned. It worked out well for both of us.

I hope that you're able to find her a good machine at a price you can afford. If she's interested in sewing this young, she might have a real talent for it.

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  #4  
Old 09/26/08, 12:33 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: SE Montana
Posts: 598

DO NOT buy her a toy machine she will not like sewing for very long.

Buy a good quality machine that has a warrenty that reflects her ability and future desires. New or Used is great.

Also some sewing stores offer childrens sewing classes. Some even offer package deal with the purchase of a machine.

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  #5  
Old 09/26/08, 01:05 AM
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There are good 3/4 sized machines that may be had for about $200 new, or might find a trade in for much less. That would be less heavy, but sturdy enough for regular sewing for a lot of years. Just thinking for a smaller person, but with growth potential.

I'm thinking in particular of the Janome JemII machines. Basic but does all the stuff you'll need to make garments or quilts, etc.

Angie

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  #6  
Old 09/26/08, 11:20 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: MO
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My grandpa got me a Singer Tiny Tailor when I was about that age. It worked great, but just did a straight stitch. When I was in high school, I got a plain jane singer and used it for years.

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  #7  
Old 09/26/08, 11:54 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wiley, Colorado
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Try shopping for a good quality machine at a Vac and sewing Repair shop. They often have the best deals and super quality machines. It will be a bargain for both of you for years to come.

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  #8  
Old 09/26/08, 01:22 PM
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,345

I have several machines, but DH thought he was doing good and bought a Brother on mark down once at Wal Mart. Does lots of the fancy stitches, auto matic button holer, and needle threader. Sews good when it will sew. Belt won't stay tight. That is NOT a good way for your daughter to learn, on a machine that is not good quality, she will get very frustrated and give it up.

Like some have said, buy her a good quality used one that has been reconditioned. You will get more BANG for your buck and your daughter will be pleased.

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  #9  
Old 09/26/08, 02:20 PM
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Kentucky
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Try thrift stores and yard sales. Old (black) Singers are nearly indestructible. $5-10 for a machine and a few bucks to have the local sewing machine place check it out and you should be good for a long time. The old machines are so much sturdier and forgiving. (We all have to learn first hand why you aren't supposed to pull the fabric when you sew. . .)
But the only nice quality machines I've had are old. A new Brother from Walmart almost stopped me from learning how to sew. It was sooo junky.

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  #10  
Old 09/26/08, 03:41 PM
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since everyone is posting their favs...


here is mine! (stop rolling your eyes! LOL!)

a singer 401

here is why.. scroll down and look at what it can do!! but ... all Singer 401, Singer 401A or the Singer 500 are equal. just because someone doesn't post photos and maybe doesn't have all the parts this one has.. the Singer Slant -O-Matic has parts and accessories available.

http://cgi.ebay.com/SINGER-401-INDUSTRIAL-STRENGTH-HEAVY-DUTY-SEWNG-MACHINE_W0QQitemZ270279119369QQcmdZViewItem?hash=i tem270279119369&_trkparms=72%3A1205|39%3A1|66%3A2| 65%3A12|240%3A1308&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14


they will sell up and down from $150 but that is a fair price.

here is one for $125 but no manual or attachments (manual is not a problem, I canl get one scanned in and PDF the file.)

http://cgi.ebay.com/Awesome-SINGER-401A-SLANT-O-MATIC-SEWING-MACHINE_W0QQitemZ310087138051QQcmdZViewItem?hash=i tem310087138051&_trkparms=72%3A1205|39%3A1|66%3A2| 65%3A12|240%3A1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

look at ebay search using Singer 401*

this is a a remarkable machine, one she can quilt on! does free motion stitching. I am not good at free motion embroidery but it can be done. All metal, gear driven and will last a lifetime! I have a group for the Singer Slant Swing Machines so there is lots of information available as well as help.

I own several 401's and just love them. It is a machine she can grow into and keep forever.

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  #11  
Old 09/26/08, 04:12 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: NM
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I have heard good things about Janome (New Home) machines. I think they are a good value for the money. I have use a Bernina and a Pfaff and they are good, but my Janome is at least as good and nowhere near as pricey. I have heard that the lower end machines for the major companies are made by Janome. When I looked at Sears one time, a good Kenmore was made by Janome.

As much hand sewing as your daughter does, she should have a machine that does both straight and zigzag stitching, and has builtin buttonhole and freearm (for pant and sleeve hems.)

Some utility and decorative stitches are nice. Most machines have some of these. I like a slow speed setting, a drop in bobbin to see how much thread is left, and a button to drop the feed dogs (for freehand embroidery and quilting. Needle up Needle down is nice.

About used machines - be aware of how heavily the machine has been used by a former owner. Some just sit around unused and some are fairly well worn out.

My DH found a White Jeans Machine at a fm about 10 years ago. He knew I wanted something light that I could travel with and he knew what features I wanted. This one had been bought for crafts and then the woman had to move to another state before she could use it. We opened it to have a look and oiled it. He got a very good buy for under $100. I have made several buttonholes with it. I took it a couple of times on cross country trips to do some mending for relatives. It is a little noisy, but can do a lot of sewing. Retail at the time was probably under $250.

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  #12  
Old 09/26/08, 05:20 PM
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Just to say, I swear by all my Janomes.

From the Mini (5 lb, would be neat)
to the 6500P (oversized.)
and the Memory Craft 6000 my daughter got from me 6 years ago that I go used in 1989.

Good machines all.

Angie

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  #13  
Old 09/27/08, 06:20 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Does your daughter hand embroider now? Some of the fancy stitches on machines are fun for special effects, but really all she probably needs is straight, zigzag, buttonhole, and blind hem.

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  #14  
Old 09/27/08, 10:41 AM
 
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she has done a few of the little animal things in hoops, is it called cross stiching?

Thanks for all the help

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  #15  
Old 09/28/08, 07:25 AM
 
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Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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If the "things in hoops" was worked with little Xs all over the fabric, that's cross stitching.

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  #16  
Old 09/28/08, 05:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeagleMommy View Post
Try thrift stores and yard sales. Old (black) Singers are nearly indestructible. $5-10 for a machine and a few bucks to have the local sewing machine place check it out and you should be good for a long time. The old machines are so much sturdier and forgiving. (We all have to learn first hand why you aren't supposed to pull the fabric when you sew. . .)
But the only nice quality machines I've had are old. A new Brother from Walmart almost stopped me from learning how to sew. It was sooo junky.

Well surprise, surprise, I agree with BeagleMommy and westbrook.
My 9 year old is learning to sew on Alice, my vintage Singer 15-91 with reverse. I think the simpler the better when they're just starting out and as mentioned, it's nearly indestructible.
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  #17  
Old 10/01/08, 03:50 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 65

I found a small 3/4 size Singer that just straight and zig zag stitches for my 11 yr old at Hancock Fabrics. I think it was about $60. It is a real machine and not a toy one. Granted she will want something fancier later (or not) but this was an inexpensive way to give her what she needed now. It is small enough for her to tote back and forth to the table and easy to set up and use.

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  #18  
Old 10/02/08, 10:04 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Harrisburg, AR
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I learned on my mother's old Admiral and to this day (several decades later) I LOVE that machine! I bought my daughter ( who did not want to learn when she was young) a Singer FashionMate at a yard sale the other day for $5 and it works perfectly. All metal, heavy duty and had enough attachements that she can stick with that one for awhile. Good Luck!

Kat

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  #19  
Old 10/02/08, 10:42 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Bodoni View Post
If the "things in hoops" was worked with little Xs all over the fabric, that's cross stitching.
Yes thats it...little x's, i think i'm going with the Janome getting ready to look on ebay now..

Thanks everyone.
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  #20  
Old 10/03/08, 06:40 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,685

I have watched this thread with great interest. It is beyond my imagination to get a 9-year old a sewing machine (and I have been sewing on a machine since I was 8 or younger). That being said, I would make sure that whatever used machine you buy is taken to a reputable dealer for servicing. Nothing could be more frustrating than a poorly functioning machine for a beginning sewer.

Please, if you don't sew yourself provide your daughter w/ some sewing lessons from someone. A sewing machine is not a toy and it is possible to get hurt using it. Also, think about a suitable size table for her to work at. A nine year old may be too small to reach the foot feed and the machine at the same time at a regular table. A box for the foot feed to set on could be adequate.

I have only sons and have never faced this issue. I tried to reason that it is like buying a gun or woodworking tools for a boy but would never have done that at 9 years old. I'm sure I am over reacting but could no longer resist offering precautions.

I wish you well

CS

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