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  #1  
Old 06/15/11, 03:24 PM
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Exclamation Canadian production wheel for sale on Ravelry

Thougth some of you might be interested in this. Great price $350 USD http://www.ravelry.com/discuss/used-...s/1704357/1-25

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  #2  
Old 06/15/11, 06:14 PM
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NO!!!!! I do NOT need that wheel, I do NOT need that wheel, I do NOT need that wheel...oh but one of these days....

and that is a great price - you could spin POUNDS of yarn a day on that wheel. Wow

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  #3  
Old 06/15/11, 09:32 PM
AppleJackCreek
 
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Cadillac of wheels, I tell ya.

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  #4  
Old 06/15/11, 10:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frazzlehead View Post
Cadillac of wheels, I tell ya.
What makes it so great? (Inquiring minds want to know.)
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  #5  
Old 06/15/11, 10:39 PM
AppleJackCreek
 
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Ooooooooh dear, Weever got me started.

Okay, the CPW is about 100 years old - the category is a modern construct, but it basically encompasses wheels that were made in Quebec around that time, most (but not all) have iron fittings at MOA and/or treadle, and big (>26") drive wheels. The defining characteristic is the tilt tension mechanism - which allows you to have really nice control over tension with just a tap or two on the MOA to tilt it more or less.

The big thing is ratio: they spin fine yarn, fast. REALLY REALLY FAST. I was working on a little saxony the other day (I just finished restoring it and needed to give it a test spin) and realized after doing a little spinning that my singles were hopelessly underspun ... I'm now used to drafting at warp speed and feeding the yarn in so quickly that I forgot to slow down on the smaller wheel!

A CPW will not do art yarn or big bulky singles - but it absolutely excels at fine singles for weaving or plying. The ratio is somewhere on the order of 18:1 - so each treadle turns the flyer 18 times (or thereabouts - it's double drive so the math gets a bit odd).

I couldn't do long draw before I got my CPW ... but wow, they were made for long draw.

So, in summary: they are gorgeous, loaded with history (I love spinning at a wheel that's been in use for a century!), spin fast and smooth with minimal work for the spinner (the weighted rim on the wheel gives it a ton of momentum so it just goes and goes, you don't have to work hard to treadle and keep it going), and make long draw easy.

I wouldn't recommend one as a first wheel unless you are already a good drop spindler (i.e. good at drafting) and can cope with having your butt kicked by the wheel for awhile until you get up to speed ... but if I had to get rid of all my wheels but one ... my CPW is the one I'd keep, hands down.

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  #6  
Old 06/16/11, 01:02 AM
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Central Iowa
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oohhhhh noooooooo lalalalalalalaalalala closing my eyes, putting on a blindfold, I'm not listening to youuuuu ! LOL

That wheel is a beauty. I would love to get my hands on it, clean it up nice and shiny. Then sit there and listen to her sing!

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  #7  
Old 06/16/11, 06:46 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Michigan's West Coast
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Very helpful, frazzle. Thank you. Not in the market for a wheel (I have a different addiction, and don't even spin), so it's safe from me. But since I hang around in the fiber world, I like to know these things.

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  #8  
Old 06/16/11, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frazzlehead View Post
Ooooooooh dear, Weever got me started.

Okay, the CPW is about 100 years old - the category is a modern construct, but it basically encompasses wheels that were made in Quebec around that time, most (but not all) have iron fittings at MOA and/or treadle, and big (>26") drive wheels. The defining characteristic is the tilt tension mechanism - which allows you to have really nice control over tension with just a tap or two on the MOA to tilt it more or less.

The big thing is ratio: they spin fine yarn, fast. REALLY REALLY FAST. I was working on a little saxony the other day (I just finished restoring it and needed to give it a test spin) and realized after doing a little spinning that my singles were hopelessly underspun ... I'm now used to drafting at warp speed and feeding the yarn in so quickly that I forgot to slow down on the smaller wheel!

A CPW will not do art yarn or big bulky singles - but it absolutely excels at fine singles for weaving or plying. The ratio is somewhere on the order of 18:1 - so each treadle turns the flyer 18 times (or thereabouts - it's double drive so the math gets a bit odd).

I couldn't do long draw before I got my CPW ... but wow, they were made for long draw.

So, in summary: they are gorgeous, loaded with history (I love spinning at a wheel that's been in use for a century!), spin fast and smooth with minimal work for the spinner (the weighted rim on the wheel gives it a ton of momentum so it just goes and goes, you don't have to work hard to treadle and keep it going), and make long draw easy.

I wouldn't recommend one as a first wheel unless you are already a good drop spindler (i.e. good at drafting) and can cope with having your butt kicked by the wheel for awhile until you get up to speed ... but if I had to get rid of all my wheels but one ... my CPW is the one I'd keep, hands down.
frazzle, I thought of you when I saw that wheel - you know so much about old wheels - if ever I decide to go out on a limb and rescue one of these old beauties - you're my "phone-a-friend" expert and I'll be calling on you for an opinion. Thanks for taking the time to help educate all of us - I really appreciate your vast knowledge and experience about these magnificent old wheels. I have little doubt that one of these days a CPW will grace my spinning corner.
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  #9  
Old 06/16/11, 09:28 AM
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I have a Quebec wheel that I bought 35 years ago in an antique barn on in Dauvelyville, Quebec.

It does spin lovely fine yarns and so quickly and smoothly.

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  #10  
Old 06/16/11, 10:23 AM
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if i would not have my 30" ashley i probably would think about getting a CPW.
i am not that good yet to use the ultra high speed whorl 40:1.
i think i would lift up the ground so fast is it going.

but one day i will

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  #11  
Old 06/16/11, 03:16 PM
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I saw an older wheel in a antique store without the flyer. Can flyers be replaced easily? How do you know (when you know so little) what kind of wheel it is? Do they mark them somehow so you can tell what they are?

My little wheel has PB Moore written on the bottom and Tekoteko -New Zealand. Which is how I traced what it is. Do they mark all wheels?

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  #12  
Old 06/16/11, 03:49 PM
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Callie as you work with your wheel and with others and as your interest grows you just kind of learn this stuff. Flyers are not easily replaced. Buying an old/antique wheel is always a risky venture especially if you don't know what you are doing. I suppose if you knew someone who was really good with woodworking they could fashion one for you, but you would have to have some understanding of what you needed and how it worked. Not all wheels are marked but you learn special things about each type or brand/breed of wheel. Kind of how you learn about breeds of sheep or dogs. You can look at one and tell what it is. There are also books about different wheels. There are specific types of wheels, castle type, flax, walking, saxony,..... the list goes on once you figure out that you think of makers and so on and so forth.

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  #13  
Old 06/16/11, 04:38 PM
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callie you really should post a picture of your little treasure.
i love your little wheel and just hope some day i can try it out.

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  #14  
Old 06/16/11, 08:14 PM
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I'll bring it to you Susanne. It is small - great for bringing to people! LOL!!!

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  #15  
Old 06/16/11, 09:14 PM
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this is so unique. have not seen that before. what did beth have to say about this wheel when you were there?

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  #16  
Old 06/16/11, 09:21 PM
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Wow, she is beautiful Callie! I have never seen a wheel like that before. How very unique. What is the story behind how you acquired her?

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  #17  
Old 06/16/11, 11:21 PM
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Beth said 'Treadle slower.." Nothing about the wheel.

The friend that got me into Finnsheep had some good friends that she cared for as they aged. He was a shepherd and over 30 years developed a flock of Corriedale x Finns. They encouraged her interest in sheep, taught her to spin, etc. The man had the wheel special-ordered for the wife. She died before she could use it. My friend learn to spin on this wheel but now has moved on to a different wheel. She sold this one to me. If I ever decide to sell it - she gets first right of refusal.

I really want to learn to do this. I spent a hour this afternoon treadling (that word just doesn't look like it's spelled correctly!). Then attached a 10 ft piece of yarn and treadled as slowly as I could and let the yarn twist, then wind onto the bobbin - over and over until the yarn was worn out.

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  #18  
Old 06/16/11, 11:55 PM
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That's the way to do it Callie.

What a very unique wheel! I've never seen a MOA (Mother-Of-All) and tensioner like that.

Would you mind getting a shot looking down on the MOA & bobbin?

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  #19  
Old 06/17/11, 12:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Callieslamb View Post
Beth said 'Treadle slower.." Nothing about the wheel.

The friend that got me into Finnsheep had some good friends that she cared for as they aged. He was a shepherd and over 30 years developed a flock of Corriedale x Finns. They encouraged her interest in sheep, taught her to spin, etc. The man had the wheel special-ordered for the wife. She died before she could use it. My friend learn to spin on this wheel but now has moved on to a different wheel. She sold this one to me. If I ever decide to sell it - she gets first right of refusal.

I really want to learn to do this. I spent a hour this afternoon treadling (that word just doesn't look like it's spelled correctly!). Then attached a 10 ft piece of yarn and treadled as slowly as I could and let the yarn twist, then wind onto the bobbin - over and over until the yarn was worn out.
i should have looked more closely how the tension nob works, now i can not remember at all.

so sad the original owner was never able to use it.
i'm very confident that you will learn to spin on this wheel.
if you ever want to move on to something else, could i be second in line???
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  #20  
Old 06/17/11, 08:30 AM
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The tension knob just twists.....
If I decide to get rid of this wheel, I have to let my friend have the first chance to buy it back from me.

But first - practice.
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