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Cattle For Those Who Like To Have A Cow.


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  #21  
Old 07/19/12, 10:39 PM
 
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If you grab some skin on the side of the neck, and pull it up so it tents up, you can put the needle right in on an angle so it hits the space you've made.
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  #22  
Old 07/20/12, 07:30 AM
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Thanks!
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  #23  
Old 07/20/12, 08:26 PM
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Yes, it is under the skin. Sub-Q means Sub cutaneous. Under the skin. As mentioned, you pinch the skin and insert the needle through the layers of skin. It is not an intramuscular (IM) shot. With Jerseys, their hide and skin is quite thick. If you put the needle in and the fluid is not going in at a good rate onc the bottle is raised, it can indicate you are not all the way through the layers of skin and you need to pull the needle out and try it again.
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  #24  
Old 08/24/12, 06:13 PM
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Bump again. > Marc
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  #25  
Old 01/20/13, 09:53 AM
 
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I have a cow getting ready to calf that went down last year. I had an emergency vet visit and a real panic attack. I remembered this thread and looked it up so I would be ready~ and decided to bump it for others that might be about to calve for the spring.
Thanks so much for the great info!
I'll be picking up the calcium today. I'll post a pic when we have a calf!
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  #26  
Old 01/20/13, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springvalley View Post
I have never heard of the 2-2-2 cure for MF, I have given my cows ACV in their water in the spring and summer for flies, and come to think of it, I don`t think I ever had problems with MF at all during that time. VERY INTERESTING. > Thanks Marc
Marc,
Been using ACV in the water troughs year round for about 4 years and haven't had a single case of MF. It's a wonder drug imho. I use it at a rate of one cup for 10 gallons of water (not that strong). It took them a while to get used to it but they gulp it down now and fly probs are lower as well as other rumen related probs.
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  #27  
Old 01/20/13, 11:41 AM
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Forgot to add, when giving IV calcium it's also a good idea to get it up close to body temperature before adding. I take my bottle, iv tube, and needle and soak them in a bucket of warm water while I'm going out to the barn to the cow. The warm slow method is less stressful on the cow and absorbs better from what I understand.
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  #28  
Old 01/20/13, 01:46 PM
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Thanks for posting this and all the comments. I hadn't intended on having a cow freshen this time of year so am glad to see any information that I hope I don't need!
I put ACV in everybody's water....chickens, horses, cows, pigs. My grandpa always did. I never knew why. He just said it was good for them (he was born in 1906).
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  #29  
Old 03/26/13, 10:50 PM
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It is that time of year.
I thought this thread deserved a bump.

Maybe I should sticky it?
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  #30  
Old 03/31/13, 10:24 AM
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I would be honored if you would sticky it. And all the good additions also. > Marc
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  #31  
Old 04/01/13, 03:26 PM
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Is there a time frame when a cow is most likely to get milk fever? 24-48 hours, longer, anytime up to a month after calving???
Thanks for this good info, btw.
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  #32  
Old 04/30/13, 01:55 PM
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Most cases of milk fever will occur within the first 48 hours post calving. With all of the hormonal changes associated with partuition, it throws the body off. That is also when the colostrum is being removed from the udder, which can also throw off the cow's systems. This is why one suggestion for curtailing the incidences of Milk Fever is to not milk the cow out fully until about 24-48 hours post calving.
Having said that, Milk Fever can occur at any stage of lactation, or pregnancy for that matter.
Some cows go down during calving with milk fever. It slows delivery and can stall it completely. Calcium is needed for the muscles to work properly. A cow in milk fever does not usually have the muscle tone required for delivery. Sluggish labor can be improved with a dose of calcium.
My cow was shaky and weak about 8 months into her lactation. We called the young vet in. About twenty minutes before he arrived, dad figured out it was milk fever. The vet was already on his way, so we let him go ahead and treat her. A mistake, of course. He wanted to put two bottles IV in a cow that was up and walking around. If he insisted on two bottles the second was going sub-q. Which caused bumps where he treated her. She went down (no surprise with two bottles in a standing Jersey). Dad retreated with one bottle sub-q and she was fine.
Another incidence occurred at the dairy farm i worked at for a number of years. The cow had been fresh for a week. She stumbled slightly crossing the ditch to leave. I told the assistant farmer she was going down with milk fever and asked if we should put her in the box stall. He said she was not since she had been fresh too long. So I did not push the matter. I was a female in my early twenties and it was not worth the argument with a "boss." The next morning I asked where she was. Sure enough, she was laid out flat way down the hill in the valley (rather than on a level in the box stall next to the milking parlor..... Called the vet out, He put two bottles in her and she beat him up the hill. I do not recall if she went down again or not that lactation.

The point is, the imbalance can occur at any stage of their lactating/gestating lives. It is most common just post calving, however.
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  #33  
Old 03/07/14, 06:51 AM
 
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I find the best thing to do is when a cow calves give her a tube of calcium no mater what. I had a herd of holstiens and milk fever was not real big issue always had a few then switched to jerseys and i started buying calcium n dextrose by the case! Id give every one tube when calved and that cut down on 90% that would need bottles. Also on first calf hiefers i find its a good time to give a magnet got then cought and tied its cheap insurance for hardware and everyone gets one.
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  #34  
Old 03/19/14, 10:22 PM
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Am I correct to understand that shouldn't be giving alfalfa (Chaffhaye, actually) to a soon-to-be freshening cow? I just pulled Peaches out of the beef herd yesterday. She is due April 4. I currently have two other cows in milk, doing once-a-day milking (morning). In the evening, I give them a small pile of Chaffhaye. Peaches is very, very low on the totem pole, so keeping her out of the chaffhaye until she freshens will not be an issue. I will withhold it 'til I hear back from ya'll.
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  #35  
Old 03/21/14, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gone-a-milkin View Post

I encourage anyone who hasnt to feel their cows ears when they are not sick.
Then you will know how they are supposed to feel.
Icy cold ears on a droopy or wobbly-seeming fresh cow means milk fever.
I kept my two, healthy in-milk cows in the stanchion a few minutes longer so DW and I could calibrate our hands to ear temp. Is there a particular zone of the ear, or just anywhere? I thought they felt cold, especially the outer half--so I'm glad we did this on healthy girls first. I did notice that one girl was warmer than the other.

I take it when you mean icy, you mean icy. Like that of a lifeless animal. When we lost our LaMancha to milk fever, we noticed that about her legs. No circulation.
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  #36  
Old 12/24/15, 07:24 PM
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Tell tale signs of milk fever.

I just recently had a Jersey get milk fever and has gotten really weak and laid down. I called the vet out and he gave her a calcium IV and told me to give a tube of the calcium the day after, which I have done but she is still not getting up and seems to be getting worse.

Any suggestions on how to help her get better? She had her calf over 3 months ago and is not an old cow so just wondering how long it should take to get her back to normal after the calcium IV.
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  #37  
Old 12/24/15, 08:17 PM
 
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I would get in touch with the vet again!
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  #38  
Old 12/28/16, 11:15 AM
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Jersey owner newbie

I know the post about milk fever is old, but maybe someone can help me anyway... Our 5 y.o. mid-size Jersey is due to calve in May. I have stopped milking due to my DH having surgery - so Comet is dried up for now. This is our first experience with milk cows, so I am confused about the alfalfa/timothy hay and how to manage it so she won't get MF... Currently I am giving her a 1-2 slices of alfalfa hay along with 2-3 slices of hay we baled off our pasture (have no idea if it has timothy in it but can ask my neighbor). She is also getting mixed grain (6# oats, 5# ground corn, 1/2# alfalfa pellets and 3/4# molasses) about 1# twice a day. The vet told me to quit the grain in about February so the calf doesn't get too big. But, what about this hay?? She cleans up every drop of hay I give her unless she doesn't like it at all (when the weather got sub-zero I put one of the neighbor's big round bales in the bale ring and she won't eat it unless she is really starving). I am a sap when it comes to my animals - would have them in the garage keeping warm, etc... if my DH would allow it... So I need firm instruction of what to do about this hay. We just re-seeded a pasture to make it more grasses favorable to dairy for next spring/summer... I hope we didn't plant the wrong things. We do non-gmo corn - no soy for my chickens - and as little treatment with abx,etc as possible for both cow and chickens. I would be grateful for any help anyone has. God Bless. Ellie
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