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  #121  
Old 03/01/12, 06:00 AM
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Originally Posted by myersfarm View Post
Radavis you will need to BE CLOSE TO A SLAUGHTER HOUSE ...that butchers for VEAL to sell as Veal..usually around big dairy markets.....most grow there own then slaughter......none around me...they also want them kept inside out of sun with no grain or grass just MILK TILL THEY GET TO 400 pounds....thats a lot of milk
if that the case I will not be doing veal,
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  #122  
Old 03/01/12, 06:13 AM
 
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I have read those before I raise in pens of 5 . milkbars have 5 to 6 nipples....yes I know they have 12 nipple milk bars but that would mean you have to get into pen and move calfs over..can not figure a easy way to feed in pens of 20 or 30 making sure each calf gets its share
One place I worked at had 30 per pen. We had a folding aluminium gate to divide the pen in half and so feed 15 at one time.
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  #123  
Old 03/01/12, 06:38 AM
Dariy Calf Raiser
 
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I did not explain it right i meant to say if you have 20 in the pen even with the gate and 10 in each pen you will have 3 fighting to get on the first nipple and none on the 9 and 10 nipple...the first 2 weeks and will have to get in pen and move them over...that takes up time on feeding instead with the 5 calfs in pen and 6 nipples on milk bars...I just move the 5 nipple milk bar to the older pens and start the new calves on the 6 nipple bars where they are extra nipples

when very young even with 5 nipples and 5 calves they just want the nipple they want and one will take 3 sips and another calf will butt her off and take 3 sips before she gets butted off INSTEAD of moving over to the empty nipple

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  #124  
Old 03/14/12, 02:42 PM
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I am a first timer here I may be paraniod but figured this was where to ask questions. We purchased to dairy cross calves 5 days ago. We think they were 2-3 days old when we got them. We gave no antibiotics, no vaccines and intend to grass feed throughout.

Day 1 "Porter" was lethargic, wouldn't stand, wouldn't eat, liquid poop, etc. We gave him electrolytes (in the middle of the night via dropper) and again in the morning and he perked right up. Later that day we gave him half electrolytes/half MR. The electrolyes say it is ok to mix the two, we followed their directions. And the next feeding he had MR and has been normal since. Thicker poop (pudding consistency) active, eating well.
Day 1 "Meatball" was active, ate well from bottle (2 pints MR). Mistake #1 I fed him too much the next morning thinking he was ready, not so much. He ended up droopy and poopy that afternoon so we fed him electrolyes for one meal, and half electro/half MR (lesson learned). After that he wasn normal for day 3 and most of day 4. Last night we noticed his poop was getting a little bit thinner (not like water but maybe gogurt constency) and had a small tinge on blood at the end. We fed as normal but today his poop is a little thinner, seems like wet snot really and had blood in it again (not a lot, but enough that I knew what it was and was like snot).
INFO:
Feed... Grade A ultra 24 Milk Replacer (non medicated) 2 pints in the am/ 1 pint 8 hrs later/ 2 pints pm (planned to switch to 2 feedings after day 10)
Behavior...ready to eat when I enter, sucks well, still bothers me when he is done trying for more, not jumping around much but up to see me and sniffing around pen, layed down a few minutes after eating, he did cough twice while I was out there (20 min) doesn't seem to have labored breathing, bright eyes, head up, stands normally, yesterday had a little bit of a runny eye (clear/whitish). He does get poop all over he when he goes but tries to clean it himself.
Housing...Fully inside barn in pen with other calf, straw bedding and haven't went outside yet. We remove any soiled straw every time we go out to check on them and have never had cows in there before. Day #2 was a dreary rainy day but the weather has been nice since then in Missouri.

I am wondering if I should just cut back food or give eletrolyes.
I get worried simply because I know it can go downhill fast with the young ones and we are certainly not experts...more like we have read the books and are scrambling through it now. Thanks for any help.

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  #125  
Old 03/20/12, 09:40 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Virginia
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I would continue with a weak mix of MR and a full 50% of electrolite, keep using a electrolite that is rated to mix with MR, some are not so good for mixing, if in dought just use straight eletro lite everyother feeding.

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  #126  
Old 03/20/12, 09:48 PM
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sounds like he has scours

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  #127  
Old 03/21/12, 08:33 AM
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Thanks He is doing a lot better now. Thankfully we caught it before it got too bad. He never did get lethargic or droopy. We did electro for about 24 hrs, then mixed 50/50. He went back to regular milk and it slowly improved. Our neighbor stopped by and when I asked him about it he said that some calves (even with their mother) simply have thin poop.
Hopefully we we have a handle on this one so that we can be ready for the next thing that comes up with them

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  #128  
Old 03/21/12, 05:34 PM
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I had a small calf pulled off a too early bred heifer, she was 4 days when I got her and was told she had had her colostrum. 2 days later she was down I happen to have some colostrum so started her on it a few oz 4 times a day. Also gave her electrolytes. Started reading on internet figured out she might have pneumonia. Im not into using antibiotics anymore than necessary. When reading thought she might have the strain that is hard to fight with them anyways. I have recently learned about Oregano Oil. I mixed it with her electrolytes so it would not burn her mouth gave it to her 2 times a day within a day she was getting up going to the milk cow I have and trying to nurse. This Oil is a great thing I recommend it highly I use it due to allergies and even with the worst year in a long time for allergies I am not having episodes like I did in the last 2 years. Go to HealthyHealth.com - This Name is Now Available to RENT or BUY !!! and you can get it pretty reasonable. Be careful with it it can burn it is hot, taste horrible, but worth all that cause it works. By the way she is up and outside running with a cow that I got that lost her calf she has now taken on the little toot toot as I call her.

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  #129  
Old 04/19/12, 09:40 PM
 
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Location: SW, Missouri
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we have only raised ten jerseyX bulls and never had to give them any antibiotic or other medicine. we did have to give a couple of them PeptoBismol when they were bloated but other than that had no issues. we slowly sold them off due to financial issues but they all went to friends and they are all still well. my husband bought me one for valentines day (yes it is romantic right? ) and he is the only one we have kept ill never sell him. i am reading all these post and had no idea there was so much that could go wrong. we just had them offered to us one day. since Red (the calf) is now on his own for the first will he get lonely? or possibly lack in the growth department since he doesnt have a buddy to compete with to eat? i would hate for something to happen to him, he is my baby

great thread!

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  #130  
Old 04/19/12, 10:01 PM
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Yes do get him a buddy, he'll thrive with a friend...Topside

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  #131  
Old 08/19/12, 09:32 AM
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So is there a way to a profitable calf rearing operation? I raised 20 last year with 2 deaths that could have been prevented. I'm running these guys with the big herd now but is there a way to profitably market weaned calves? Apparently in NZ they have gone to once a day feedings which cut labor costs and increase DM intake sooner. I'm in VA and holstein bull calves are expensive like ~$50-80. Has anyone crunched the numbers? Thanks!

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  #132  
Old 09/17/12, 10:19 PM
 
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Location: Montana
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Here people are selling their day old holstein calves for $200-$300 each. They don't sell quick that I know of so they are usually a week old before being sold.

I used to work a sale barn in high school and it was my job to load and unload the trucks. What an experience that was. Have to be quick on your feet and climb walls like spiderman. With the calves the most we had to do was push them from behind to get them to move. The pen for the calves was the one closest to the arena for obvious reasons and thick with sawdust and had it's own loadout door. Our barn did not allow anyone to use cattle prods or whips of any kind anywhere in the barn. We did carry canes because they make your arms longer when you are trying to sort 3 head out of a pen of 50. Some cows that came in were just plain wild and scared, with those you opened the gate and got out of the way. In the 3 years I worked there I only saw one cow that was hit with a cane and that was because it was charging and there was no where to go. They were also good for steering pigs in the right direction. The bulls were always fun to run up the alley to the arena. You always had to have 2 gates between each bull and they did not come off the scales until the previous one was secured in it's pen. Nothing worse than a bull fight in a 4 foot wide alley.

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  #133  
Old 11/11/12, 02:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by BlueHillsFarm View Post
So is there a way to a profitable calf rearing operation? I raised 20 last year with 2 deaths that could have been prevented. I'm running these guys with the big herd now but is there a way to profitably market weaned calves? Apparently in NZ they have gone to once a day feedings which cut labor costs and increase DM intake sooner. I'm in VA and holstein bull calves are expensive like ~$50-80. Has anyone crunched the numbers? Thanks!
The science of once-a-day calf feeding | Calf Rearing

I personally disagree with some of the things they say in this article. I believe you should not contemplate OAD feeding until the calves are feeding well, milk meal and hay, and are healthy. People who have done this system say if it is not done absolutely perfectly all you accomplish is to turn good calves into poor calves. No matter how well you manage this they always look bad for at least 4-6 weeks.
Calves here cost between $30-$120 depending on breed (it is illegal to sell calves less than 4 days old). Milk powder approx $75-$100 per 20kg bag and you need 1 1/2 bags. Or if buying waste milk (peniclin milk) from dairy farm at 10-12 cents per litre= approx $40. Selling weaned calves at 100kgs + $330 - $460, once again depending on breed. This is for dairy bulls and beef cross bulls & heifers.
Example Freisian bull calf $60 raw milk $40 meal $44 tags vac meds etc $25 sell at $350.
Or Same calf at $120 plus CMR 1 1/2 bags =$150 plus meal $44 plus tags vacinations medicine debudding etc= $25 Sell at $330. Sometimes you make money sometimes you dont.

A fully recorded dairy heifer 4 days old with a good BW and/or PW will cost around $650-700.
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  #134  
Old 12/24/12, 07:05 PM
 
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My parents had a small dairy up until their last child(me) left for college. They kept a few beef cows. Later when I settled in a job I added to the herd. Sometimes I have had a cow not accept a calf and I would bottle feed the calf. These were beef cattle and my experience was that it did not pay to bottle raise calves, unless you kept it on grass until it was large. Money is made from beef cattle off grass, not hay and certainly not expensive ground feed. 2 years ago we got tired of chasing cows that got out and I sold out the little herd. later I bought 300 pound heifers from the stock yard, fed them some and let them eat grass sold them after they doubled their weight. Haven't figured out the final money figures yet, but have just bought some more. The first lot I had one death loss and a vet bill for one with pinkeye. So far this lot is healthy.

In this area, Western SC, beef calves go for a much larger price that dairy calves. Once I had a cow die suddenly, leaving a month old calf. I bottle fed it long enough to get it healthy, took it to the sale, stood and announced the reason for selling, the breed details, the age of the calf, and the fact that it was feeding from a bottle. It sold real well, maybe $150, which is a lot higher that dairy calves bring.

People do not pay much for jersey calves because they take a long time to grow out. according to people that have tried them. Holsteins are much more popular. Dairies in the area are a short haul from the sale barn and calves are sold early, right after goats so they should have a good chance at being healthy. I would like to try holstein steers that someone has bottle raised to 300 pounds, then plan on keeping them a year or so until they are 1,000 pounds, howeve, I haven't seen any at the sales and the word is that someone else buys all he can find.

In short, I have the facilities and the time, but I can't see bottle feeding paying off.

COWS

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  #135  
Old 12/30/12, 06:16 AM
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Not so fast. It's probably Jersey bull calves bringing ten bucks and (guessing your in dairy country) holstein bulls bringing 60 plus dollars. This is because of the price difference when they are bigger. I would go with the stein myself-you can hardly give away a jersey steer.

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  #136  
Old 12/30/12, 06:27 AM
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I do this for a living in Kansas so heres my thoughts on the matter. First of all if the baby you buy didn't get "mamas milk" within 24 hours there is nothing you can do to keep it alive-it will die within 5 days usually. There are very good replacements for mamas milk that can be bought but if the calf doesn't have it in first 24hours it don't matter.
So now with the feeding, you probably are best off with medicated milk replacer (it helps prevent scours) and you can use the electrolites for fast energy but don't over use them. Also if a calf is starting to scour the best thing I'v found for the money is "One Day Response". Its a small package you mix with water and if they won't or cant drink it you tube them. It must be fed instantly after mixing cause it will thicken.
It never hurts to give a calf you just purchased a small (3-5cc) of anti. (penniclin cheapest, nu-flor you need perscribtion).
I feed young (under two weeks) 3 times a day (morning, noon and nite) but only feed 3/4 of a bottle. DO NOT OVERFEED IT. If you do you will kill him with the scours. And be smart, if its a 40 pound calf, feed him less and if he's a 120 pound calf, feed him more.
Keep them dry and winter weather is better than summer if your just starting out. Start them on ground milo or a calf pellet you can buy at your local elevator by day 3. Live and learn.

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  #137  
Old 01/04/13, 11:38 PM
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I Have Bought 6 Jersey bulls They are 5 to 7 Days old the seller says. Also Says they have had the First Colostrum milk. He is feedin them twice a day MR 2 qts per feedin. I went to Farm last week Got there About 6:30 pm. Got 6 bulls That looked good, bright ,bouncy and ate good, a lil scours, Didnt bother me much ,I knew they would scour from the 3 hr ride and transition. Brought them home, Got home about 10:30 pm Put them in a good clean strawed small barn With each other . Next morning 5 dead. ????? I have called the farmer He said he would Give me 5 more Which he said he usally would not, But he said that did not sound right. When i put them in the barn they all seemed to be alert 3 were a little weak in the back but good stand Gave them Penicillan. And the ones with shot died and the ones without died.WHAT should I do about gettin these babies home and ease my Problems. I am not new to bottle Calves, Worked on a dairy for 2ys and a beef farm for 8 yrs. Just been out of the game for a while And wonder if there are new things I can do. I know the cold is hard on them as well. I Am Gettin Calf Blankets to bring them back in , And they will bee in the back of my truck with a camper shell on it.And was going to try to get some Baytril to shoot them with, And give them electrolyte when i get them home.Any other things should I do???

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  #138  
Old 01/14/13, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by SugarCrkRanch View Post
I Have Bought 6 Jersey bulls They are 5 to 7 Days old the seller says. Also Says they have had the First Colostrum milk. He is feedin them twice a day MR 2 qts per feedin. I went to Farm last week Got there About 6:30 pm. Got 6 bulls That looked good, bright ,bouncy and ate good, a lil scours, Didnt bother me much ,I knew they would scour from the 3 hr ride and transition. Brought them home, Got home about 10:30 pm Put them in a good clean strawed small barn With each other . Next morning 5 dead. ????? I have called the farmer He said he would Give me 5 more Which he said he usally would not, But he said that did not sound right. When i put them in the barn they all seemed to be alert 3 were a little weak in the back but good stand Gave them Penicillan. And the ones with shot died and the ones without died.WHAT should I do about gettin these babies home and ease my Problems. I am not new to bottle Calves, Worked on a dairy for 2ys and a beef farm for 8 yrs. Just been out of the game for a while And wonder if there are new things I can do. I know the cold is hard on them as well. I Am Gettin Calf Blankets to bring them back in , And they will bee in the back of my truck with a camper shell on it.And was going to try to get some Baytril to shoot them with, And give them electrolyte when i get them home.Any other things should I do???
Well from my experience Jerseys are more susceptible to stress so there's one strike.

You say that they were scouring a little bit when you bought them so there's another strike against you. I never buy a weak or scouring calf. If they are scouring a little bit they are already becoming dehydrated. I would not have bought calves or I would have at least given them electrolytes for the trip home.

Also a 3 hour drive is a very long way for these guys. Even big cattle get stressed and sick from such an ordeal, ie shipping fever. I would not buy from a farm that far away. 30 minute drive tops for me.

They DEFINITELY need electrolytes after the trip. I always give electrolytes after getting them home which for me is usually a 15 minute trip.

I also assume temps dipped below 50 degrees that night where you live = more stress.

So all in all STRESS + DEHYDRATION + COLD killed your calves. I hope you got them cheap! =)
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  #139  
Old 02/02/13, 12:02 AM
 
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Location: Sulphur Rock, AR
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I am a newbie to bottle feeding calves. We went to the auction a month ago and we purchased 4 bull calves. Well we lost one within 3 days from pneumonia. The other 3 are doing great and they are eating grain and hay. And we just banded them last week. I will say that this has all been a great learning experience for me and now I am searching to find more bottle calves. The 3 that I still have follow me around like little puppies everywhere I go.

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  #140  
Old 02/02/13, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by RedBuffalo View Post
I am a newbie to bottle feeding calves. We went to the auction a month ago and we purchased 4 bull calves. Well we lost one within 3 days from pneumonia. The other 3 are doing great and they are eating grain and hay. And we just banded them last week. I will say that this has all been a great learning experience for me and now I am searching to find more bottle calves. The 3 that I still have follow me around like little puppies everywhere I go.
Usually raising bottle calves can be quite rewarding, most new raisers are terrified of the sale barn, glad you were not....Congrats.
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  #141  
Old 02/02/13, 08:03 AM
 
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Well I was scared but excited about them at first but not because they were from the auction, but for the fact that these were the first calves I personally have ever owned. Then I started to get nervous after the first one died but we did everything we could to try to save him but it was too late. But like I said it was a great learning experience. And I will for sure do it again. I have got 3 great looking holstein calves right now. Even though they aren't sucking from a bottle anymore I still am giving them milk replacement, I am mixing it in with their grain.

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  #142  
Old 02/22/13, 08:27 AM
 
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Location: Manton, MI
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Holstein Heifer for sale, 2 1/2 months old, weaned and eating hay/grain. asking for 500 dollars if anyone is interested.

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  #143  
Old 04/01/13, 11:42 AM
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Jersey Milk Cows and dairy heifers for sale-MO

http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/3711726734.html

PM or email through CL

All of the milking animals were born/raised and freshened right here. Our children are getting older and leaving home and we have a large herd of dairy goats as well. We have 4 cows in milk currently and are looking to reduce the work load on the older kids.

Contact me with any questions.
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  #144  
Old 06/22/13, 11:48 AM
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Newbie Advice - Auction calf

Picked up our first auction bull calf - want to raise him for beef. We paid $43 - figured if it didn't work out, it wouldn't be a huge loss (not to be insensitive, he is a beautiful animals). He is a 88lb Holstein. First night, I had to coax/force him to eat and stand - gave him raw cow milk mixed with raw goat milk, about 1.5 qts. We assumed the diary selling him at least gave him colostrum (to not do so seems like abuse) and that he was/is not more than a few days old (auction is every Tuesday).

Next day, went to TSC for milk replacer, etc. That day he had ploppy poop and a little poop that was mucousy with a touch of blood.

Day two fed Dumore Milk Replacer non-medicated (was all our local store had) 2x a day at 2 qrts each feeding (topped with some raw milk from the store) and 2 qrts of electrolytes in the afternoon because he doesn't seem to be drinking water from a tub. Also gave him a vitamin paste (B12 and others) and a probiotic paste, and 90cc of kaolin between bottles.

Day three, he still seemed like he was having a hard time getting up (harder than it seems a calf should at least), gave him a vit E & Sel paste, more probiotic paste and about 60cc of kaolin.

We are on day four. Over all he seems perky, wags his tail when eating, butts for more, gets up easier and is surer on his feet. We have him in our trailer at night until he is a bit bigger, and today and last night he was able to get in and out on his own (theres a ramp). He has gotten a little bit of poop on his back legs, but cleaned it off. Some poop on his tail, and today, a bit on one side of his rear. He has a wet nose. He had and still has a nice dry umbilical.

I am concerned and have questions about a few things: one, his poops still seem awfully soft, like pudding that has sat out and softened to a thick liquid, brownish yellow to brown, sometimes kinda dribbly (lands on the ground in a string) and sometimes a little thicker. I can't decide if he has mild scours or not?? He is urinating well.

Should I continue with just electrolytes and kaolin or medicate? I went back to the store and bought Sav-a-caf medicated (neomycin and oxyteracycline) and some penicillin just in case... I don't want to administer antibiotics and destroy tummy bacteria if I don't have to. We don't have a local vet that does large animals - most everything is on us unless we want to call in someone from about 50 miles away. Everything the store sells in other antibiotics comes in huge containers, not to mention there are so many choices.

Two, he seems like his eyes are watering and he has some mucousy boogers around his nostrils - is this normal or should I be concerned? I don't hear a cough.

Also, when I go to check on him, sometimes parts of his coat are wet and seem ruffled - is he cleaning himself??



Also, misc. - when is a good age to dehorn and does anyone have any good videos to reference on doing it? This guy has a lot of strength already, I have a hard time imagining dehorning. Are we supposed to use an electric dehorner before they break the skin? Are any Holsteins naturally polled? I can feel two bumpy areas on the top of his head, but never having dehorned anything, I am not sure if they are the right spot.


When is a good time to vaccinate? I figured I should wait until I am sure he is healthy??

Helpful notes or suggestions would be greatly appreciated - especially photos of calf poop, lol.

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  #145  
Old 06/22/13, 12:38 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Michigan
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Poops on a calf only getting a liquid diet will be soft. Consistantly thick, but not solid at all, is how calf poops look. Won't turn green until he eats pellets or grazes, but will STILL be soft and mushy. That is how cow poop looks! Any hardness means he needs more liquids, probably a LOT more liquids. The stringy part, could be from cleaning his nose. I don't know if I would keep trying different medications, you may not be letting them work long enough to have a helpful effect. For me, scours in a calf is really runny poops, mostly liquid. Your calf doesn't sound like that.

He does need lots of liquid, so the electrolytes probably helped, and the extra bottle mid afternoon keeps him lubricated. Calves get dehydrated so easily, and our Vet considers it the main reason bottle babies die. Electrolytes might work mixed in with his milk replacer too, for a bit longer. We fed our calves 3 bottles of milk replacer daily, which is what the Vet recommended. They were regular calf bottles, so I think they held 2 quarts each feeding. Our calf didn't drink from the bucket or tub of water for quite a while beyond the couple weeks of age. Didn't seem to understand or want water then. Make sure tub is not big enough for calf to fall into and drown. Bucket is safer at his age. He also needs a shady place to lay around, little babies like that do often lay around quite a bit. If he was a beef calf, his mom would park him in the AM, go out and graze, come back for a noon feeding, then leave him again. He wouldn't be up running about much at such a young age.

Our calves did lick themselves some, even young. So he could be wet from that licking.

I would be washing his face, clean off eyes and nose a couple times a day, so the flies are not reinfecting him with germs as they walk on those boogers and drainage.

I would wait on the shots for a couple weeks, get him healthy first. I would certainly include Tetnus in his shots, to keep him safe. Good also for when you band him in preventing problems. I would practice leading him with a slip-rope halter DAILY, keep him used to doing as YOU direct him to do. Just leading him in and out of the trailer will be very helpful in keeping him under control and tamed for doing what you want.

We never bought an auction calf, ours came from the dairy farms, so we had little in the way of problems. I did pay for the more expensive medicated milk replacer, "just to be safe". Our dairy farm calf just wasn't as exposed to so many germs as auction calves are.

Hope to hear more reports of his good progress.

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  #146  
Old 06/22/13, 02:07 PM
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I've decided to go with 3 smaller feedings instead of just two, plus electrolytes, until he's a bit older and I'm not so worried about setting off scours.

His poops look a lot better today, but there is still some yellow mucous on the sides of his nose... When he runs a bit, he gives a little cough, but it's not regular.

He has two buckets with water and a bucket with a few handfuls of starter feed. I put some on my hand at each feeding and he takes a nibble.

I washed his face, legs, and rear end today, and gave him a little wipe down.

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  #147  
Old 06/22/13, 03:17 PM
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Location: Pennsylvania
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Also, we haven't used any medication yet, other than electrolytes and kaolin. I just bought them as a precaution and wanted to be ready in case he took a turn down hill.

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  #148  
Old 06/22/13, 05:29 PM
 
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Location: Michigan
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Glad to hear he is still improving. Seemed like our calves were just very slow at eating solid stuff. Much rather have their bottle until almost 2 months old. We started them with alfalfa pellets, the small ones. Didn't do calf pellets.

The coughing thing needs watching, don't want him going into pneumonia. Running and frolicking is good, makes him breathe deeply, so he gets air deep into all lung parts. Hoping he shakes it loose to come out and clear up.

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  #149  
Old 07/11/13, 07:53 AM
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Location: Pennsylvania
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So far, so good. My crazy husband even talked me into going back for another. So now we have a 3 week old holstein calf and a 1 week old jersey calf. Both are doing well. I was worried about the Jersey for a few days, as he came home with a wet umbilical and gave us a hard time eating the first two days, but we did colostrum as soon as he got home, put a dog e-collar on him to keep him from licking the cord, soaked the cord in triodine, and gave him penicillin for 4 days. Now he's an obnoxious little fellow.


Question for you all: When do you band? We waited with the Holstein until he was feeling better, and it was rather difficult to do. With the Jersey, I decided to just get it over and done with his first night while he didn't have a lot of fight in him - made it so much easier.

Another question: My husband, who is a bit nuts, has his heart set on leaving the horns on. I want to remove them. Any stories or experiences on folks who have left them on - good or bad? If we go with paste, when do you apply it?

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  #150  
Old 07/11/13, 10:32 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: On a dirt road in Missouri
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I band early, for the reason you mentioned. Any time I can tag and band without running them up to the working pens, it is a bonus. So I get them very young, if possible.

If it were me, I wouldn't disbud/dehorn anything destined for the freezer. You'll here lots of bad stories about what happens with horns, and they are an issue, for sure. But for an animal that isn't going to get handled a great deal, I wouldn't push it. If you had a dairy heifer that was going to be a milker, on the other hand, it would be worth considering. Our dairy cows still have theirs, but I indend on dealing with them when fly season is over.

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