You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of Homesteading Today!    
Homesteading Forum

Go Back   Homesteading Forum > Livestock Forums > Cattle

Cattle For Those Who Like To Have A Cow.


Like Tree16Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #61  
Old 04/28/10, 10:50 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
I just watched a few clips on you-tube. It seems pretty thorough. Probably worth the $27. Looks like you need a hoist truck to make this system work. He says in the video you need a 15 ft hoist for large sized cows. My barn has 11 ft side walls, but I am sure the peak is 15 ft. I guess I could put a hoist at the peak and process in my barn.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 06/08/10, 02:20 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Southwest Oklahoma
Posts: 8
From reading these posts I am on the verge of concluding that butchering females for beef is not recommended; that we should butcher steers or bulls. Is this right? I am building my homestead. I am ignorant with reguard to beef. I'm just now starting to get my horses, mules and chickens to the point that I know a little bit about them. Thanks for all the posts on this stuff. It is helping.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 06/08/10, 05:33 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
Females can reproduce, making them more valuable because they can provide many additional animals. Female's, heifers/cows are fine to eat if you so choose or if they happen to be a twin which are most often infertile.
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 06/08/10, 10:24 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Southwest Oklahoma
Posts: 8
Smile Thanks Much

Quote:
Originally Posted by trbizwiz View Post
Females can reproduce, making them more valuable because they can provide many additional animals. Female's, heifers/cows are fine to eat if you so choose or if they happen to be a twin which are most often infertile.
Thank you. I suppose I hadn't thought about keeping a cow until now. I was going to buy two weaned calves per year, Eat one and sell the other and buy two more. I will now consider getting a cow. My neighbor has bucking bulls, perhaps she will let me make a deal with her.

Thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 06/08/10, 10:37 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
Buying bottle calves from a dairy can be a low cost option for cattle as well. I bought 4 this march for $240 total. And have under $100 in milk replacer in them $10 in calf starter and $9 in sweet feed. They have doubled their weight and are growing nicely. It will be two years before they are ready to butcher, but I won't have much more to spend on them. They eat grass and ill stockpile forage this fall to get them through winter. So all I'll pay for is water from my well.
I do have a pair of heifers as well. I have over $1500 in them and not much as far as inputs. They are off site right now being bred. I'll have them back here in a month. I am kinda hoping for heifer calves to build a herd. But a bull calf would be fi e too. I can breed his momma back to his daddy and sell the cow calf pair. Then replace them with 3 or 4 new heifers with the sale revenue. Then I would have five cows to breed and a non related bull to breed them to all on site. With very little extra out of pocket.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 07/07/10, 07:54 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 29
I'm now part of a large family that butchers "as a family". They have a rather large farm... well "Dad" does. He is in his 80's and the kids are in their 40's and 50's... then there are adult grandkids... We butcher approx 12 cattle and 20 hogs. They try to get it all done in 2 weeks during the winter. I had butchered before on a much smaller scale.
Amazing! A huge family gathering where everyone helps right down to my 5 year old daughter, who writes on the packages.

"D" day is a very small group of people, that prepare the animals so they are "pieces of meat" instead of that big brown eyed cow that my dd used to feed grass a few months earlier. Approx 4 cows and 6 beef hang in the barn for around 3 days at a time. Longer would be nice, but weather is always a concern and there are a lot more to do.

They raise mostly Angus on the farm, but those are to sell. As DH says, "someone told those silly house wives that Angus is better, so that is what we sell them." We usually eat Holstien, but we got an Jersey one year. Only difference I noticed was the amount of meat. When "D" day comes, the largest go first, but even with 2 weeks extra growth, the Jersey are quite a bit smaller.

DH also cures out ot the hams and bacon. This years bacon and hams were exellent! Last year he didn't notice that Dad had bought IODIZED salt. Don't make that mistake when curing pork.
mulemom and Pokletu like this.

Last edited by nermal64; 07/07/10 at 07:57 PM. Reason: I can't spell and my grammer is terrible!
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 07/07/10, 11:19 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 833
i know a guy that gets dairy calves 4 of them every year and pumps the grain through them and sends them to the butcher in a year his biggest one was 1156lbs hanging weight and there holsteins and right at 12 months he dont feed much hay at all keeps them in a pretty good size barn no pasture or any thing just grain and water his cows were kinda fatty tasting

now the last 2 i tried something a little different i had under 3 tons of feed in them just feed them grass and hay and salt and miniral blocks they were 20 months when they went in but they were small biggest one was 561 i think or 551 and the other one was 501 the one was a holstein other was a jersey angus mix and he was the 501lb one but my meat is like no fat at all really good tasting but gotta watch when you cook it
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 07/07/10, 11:39 PM
Registered Users
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry.kimbrell View Post
Thank you. I suppose I hadn't thought about keeping a cow until now. I was going to buy two weaned calves per year, Eat one and sell the other and buy two more. I will now consider getting a cow. My neighbor has bucking bulls, perhaps she will let me make a deal with her.

Thanks again.
Jerry

You might want to think twice before getting animals from a herd that are used for breeding bucking bulls. The few bucking herds I've been around are some of the wildest cattle I've ever been seen. Not saying they are all like that, but some of that bucking disposition is genetic. For someone who has little cattle experience, I would strongly suggest you look for animals with a very gentle disposition. Wild, crazy cattle can put a major case of hurt on even the most experienced person.

Just my 2 cents worth
Pokletu likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 07/29/10, 11:09 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
I read this month in the Stockman Grass Farmer about a book called the steak book or something like that. Anyway the author took a trip all over the world trying different steaks from different types of farming techniques. He said by far the best steak he had was from a 30 month old female that had never been bred. He also said most Kobe beef is not regularly massaged and fed beer as i had often heard. The article was a very good read. I don't know if its available for free on line or not, I get the actual magazine.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 09/08/10, 09:49 PM
pastelsummer's Avatar  
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: idaho
Posts: 263
i raise mine best meat i ever had. I used mr as an infant untill 6 weeks then grain and mollasses and hay untill they are eating good then they get oat/alfalfa hay and the pastures of grass hay. we raise then untill a min of 1000 lbs and we use jersy and holstien.... But i think the best meat it a cross between the two.
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 12/12/10, 02:24 PM
Uncle JD's Avatar  
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Small Farm outside of Lawton, Oklahoma in Comanche County
Posts: 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by tyusclan View Post
We usually buy dairy bottle calves because they're cheap. I like to get Holsteins, but they have gotten more expensive lately. We just bought three Jersey bull calves for $35.00 each. We bottle them for about 6 weeks or until they're eating well. We give them all the grass or hay they will eat and supplement with a little grain until they're about a year old. Then start upping the grain a little at a time till they're about 16 months old. For the last 45 to 60 days we feed them all they'll eat. Usually wind up with about 900-1000 lbs. hanging weight at 18 months. I don't expect the Jerseys to do quite that well, though.
Hi, I know this was posted a long time ago, but, I would like to ask about feeding these animals for freezer beef. I don't have any established grass for them to do any real grazing. I have been told that I could keep them penned up in a small area (2 calves penned up on 1/2 acre) and feed them with all the hay, (alfalfa and bermuda) that they can eat, plus grain and cubes on an increasing basis, and then finish them as described above. Does this sound feasible? I have found two weaned calves, one Jersey and one Holstien mix (both steers) for 135.00 each. I am about to buy them. I am always looking for good advice. Thanks to anyone who will offer it.
Blessings,
jd
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 12/12/10, 03:08 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle JD View Post
Hi, I know this was posted a long time ago, but, I would like to ask about feeding these animals for freezer beef. I don't have any established grass for them to do any real grazing. I have been told that I could keep them penned up in a small area (2 calves penned up on 1/2 acre) and feed them with all the hay, (alfalfa and bermuda) that they can eat, plus grain and cubes on an increasing basis, and then finish them as described above. Does this sound feasible? I have found two weaned calves, one Jersey and one Holstien mix (both steers) for 135.00 each. I am about to buy them. I am always looking for good advice. Thanks to anyone who will offer it.
Blessings,
jd



This will work and likely be quite effective, however it will be very costly. You'll have a few hundred in hay and a hundred or so in minerals and probably close to that in protein.
It'll be fun and educational. But buying a side from a neighbor will be more cost effective. Maybe you should consider co-op ing with a neighbor. If they'll let you put a couple of weened calves in with their cattle you'll provide the minerals and help them work the all cattle. Youll get some free experience and education he'll get a helper.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 12/12/10, 11:03 PM
Uncle JD's Avatar  
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Small Farm outside of Lawton, Oklahoma in Comanche County
Posts: 268
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by trbizwiz View Post
This will work and likely be quite effective, however it will be very costly. You'll have a few hundred in hay and a hundred or so in minerals and probably close to that in protein.
It'll be fun and educational. But buying a side from a neighbor will be more cost effective. Maybe you should consider co-op ing with a neighbor. If they'll let you put a couple of weened calves in with their cattle you'll provide the minerals and help them work the all cattle. Youll get some free experience and education he'll get a helper.
That is a great idea. Thank you very much.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 12/27/10, 12:19 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
Posts: 1,000
Sorry,I read most of these posts and didn't see this answered.
It's probably a stupid Q. but when you buy or sell 1/4 of beef is it either a front or hind or just 1/4 of everything?
Also, the hanging weight,how much of that is actual meat? How much bones ?
Thanks,Chris
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 12/27/10, 04:07 PM
sassafras manor's Avatar  
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: central Illinois
Posts: 433
Chris - we sell ours by the hanging weight vs. live weight since we do not have access to scales. I call the processor the day after slaughter and he gives me the hanging weight for the 1/2 or 1/4. Ours are grass fed with a light amount of grain (8-10 lbs/day) for the last 60 days and we get $2.00/lb hanging weight for 1/2's and $2.25/ lb hanging weight for 1/4's. When we sell 1/4's they are not the front or hind 1/4 but rather 1/2 of the 1/2 which gives both customers access to the same cuts of meat. Did I make any sence? I hope this helps. I have ours priced accordingly so that i am able to pay for the costs of the calves, all feed, meds, wormers, and processing for our beef plus a little in our pocket. In turn it puts meat on the table for free and pay me some for the time.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 12/28/10, 01:01 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
Posts: 1,000
Thanks Sassafrass,yes it makes perfect sense.
That's actually how I thought it would be till someone mentioned front and hind.
Is there a percentage of the hanging weight that will be actual meat?
Do you get all the bones(from the hanging weight)?
Thanks,Chris
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 12/31/10, 02:15 AM
francismilker's Avatar
Udderly Happy!
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 2,835
UFO,

I think the percentage of live weight versus meat in the freezer is doing good to hit 58-60% It depends a lot on the breed of critter you're fattening. On the question of "do you get all the bones?" I think it depends on how you ask for it to be processed. If you want all hamburger and don't ask for any soup or dogbones then you're not getting any bones.........If you know what I mean.
__________________
Francismilker

"The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much" James 5:16
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 12/31/10, 09:55 PM
sassafras manor's Avatar  
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: central Illinois
Posts: 433
UFO we just picked up our first beef from the processor today. This is for a grass fed Angus heifer that was 22 months old. Hanging weight was 525# and bring home meat was 390#. Of that 188# was ground burger, 88# of various roasts and 114# of steaks. I was happy and look forward to the first meal.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 01/01/11, 12:59 AM
arabian knight's Avatar
Miniature Horse lover
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: West Central WI.
Posts: 24,605
I just got one done, it was a Jersey steer 16 months old, hanging wt. of just under 1,000 lbs, took home 610 pounds. Not bad at all for a dairy steer. But then that weight gain was mostly from being fed only a grain mix, the last 6 months.
And I will be getting another Jersey calf in a few months and start one again. And at 40 bucks a week old null calf that is not bad wt. gain over those 16 months.
And after 16 months I will have most of that meat used up ready for the new one.
__________________
Oh my, dishes yet to wash and dry

See My Pictures at
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/0903/arabianknight/
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 01/02/11, 08:23 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
Posts: 1,000
Thanks Guys. I called the local place and they said you loose about 1/3 from live weight to hanging weight and then 1/3 of that to bones .
I know there are a few variants but I guess it's some idea.
Arabian Knight- that 610 ,was that the hanging weight ,right?
Thanks,Chris
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:18 PM.