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Cattle For Those Who Like To Have A Cow.


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  #41  
Old 08/25/09, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by OJ Rallye View Post
Interesting thread and it inspired me to get out the bill for the last beef we bought. Grass fed not certified organic. I opted for 1/2 steer to get some of all cuts. Billed:
190# beef @ $2.75# = $522.50
$98.15 butchers fees (mentions 190# cut,wrap and freeze)
$620.65 total 3 boxes of freezer wrapped meat and soup bones. I weighed all the packages and it was under 125# with the wrapping.
LAdy we bought it from called to ask how we liked it. Flavor is great but how could we get only 120#s of meat and bones from 1/2 a steer and pay over $600? "You lose a lot in processing!" That was before I found out how fat the ground beef is.

Did she keep almost 1/3 of the meat we bought?
With a steer what are the percentages of weight ie. live vs hanging vs processed?
I pulled out a couple of sheets from the butcher we use. We took a angus/jersey cross in that had been milk fed. The live weight was 1080. The hanging weight was 674. They say it can be up to 35% less than the hanging weight on the actual pounds of meat you get. Hope this helps. You figure they take out more bone and fat, plus letting it hang takes out some moisture.
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  #42  
Old 09/09/09, 04:19 PM
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I have a holstien that is about 7 months. I feed her 4 way grain and corn. Also good hay. She really doesent like the hay too much but eats all the grain.
Will my meat be OK? This is my 1st cow so I'm new at this.

Thanks
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  #43  
Old 09/10/09, 06:00 AM
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This is about the same diet my kid's show steers get. I keep enough hay in front of them to keep them a little solid in the backend. They prefer the grain and only eat a small amount of hay but I keep it in front of them freechoice. I get better rate of gain from the grain and that's part of the competition.
Anyway, regarding your meat being good. It'll be great. As long as your animal's healthy and eating well and not scouring on it's mostly grain based diet, you're gonna love it.

The reason most folks are trying to go grass-based on feeding one out is due to the expense of the grain products I'd suppose.

BTW, if she's only seven months old I'd figure her to be in the 5-600 lb. range. If you want to get a significantly larger yield, you might try holding her over until she's above 1000 lbs. before you butcher.
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  #44  
Old 09/23/09, 06:31 PM
 
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I currently have highlander cows and a highlander bull.I need some replacement heifers.I give the steers corn the last ninty days.I sell all I have and keep a quarter for ourselves.I've had jersey,angus,holstein,shorthorn, and probably others over the years.They are all good.
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  #45  
Old 11/18/09, 11:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by francismilker View Post
This is about the same diet my kid's show steers get. I keep enough hay in front of them to keep them a little solid in the backend. They prefer the grain and only eat a small amount of hay but I keep it in front of them freechoice. I get better rate of gain from the grain and that's part of the competition.
Anyway, regarding your meat being good. It'll be great. As long as your animal's healthy and eating well and not scouring on it's mostly grain based diet, you're gonna love it.

The reason most folks are trying to go grass-based on feeding one out is due to the expense of the grain products I'd suppose.


BTW, if she's only seven months old I'd figure her to be in the 5-600 lb. range. If you want to get a significantly larger yield, you might try holding her over until she's above 1000 lbs. before you butcher.

And I always thought that it was for the well proven health benefits!
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  #46  
Old 11/27/09, 11:11 AM
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From what I've recently seen at the sale barn prices versus buying enough grain/hay to finish one out, it would be far cheaper IMHO to buy one at the sale that's already pretty close and then dumping the grain to him for a few weeks than rearing him from the bottle.
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  #47  
Old 12/14/09, 09:05 PM
 
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Just a note for first time Jersey beef eaters. The fat is yellow. This is completely normal for jerseys and quite tasty. Just didn't want you to freak out when you open that first package.
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  #48  
Old 12/18/09, 09:04 PM
 
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I raise registered charolais and always put one in the freezer. It is a cull heifer or steer that just does not make the grade. Wean them off at 6 to 7 months, pasture for the summer and I like to start them on grain after a good freeze. This will kill most of the grasses and mainly wild onions. Put good hay, fresh water and a salt block in front of them free choice, feed five gallon bucket of beef producer from co-op for three to four months then take to slaughter house at around 900 to 1100 pounds. Hanging weight is around 60% and the final cut, wrap nd freeze weight will be at around 50 to 55% of live weight.
Slaughter house I use charges $30 kill bill and $0.38 / pound dressed weight to cut wrap and freeze. I was going to us another slaughter house this year but was too late getting a kill date, they charge $24 kill bill and $0.23 / pound live weight to cut, vaccum pack and freeze, next year.
I figure at the most I will have $3.25/pound (more like $2.95) in the finished product and that includes a dollar a pound live weight for the beef, feed, haul and pick up bill, and some monies for the freezer.

forgot to add that we use to raise beefalo (cross of bison and bovine) and that was by far the best meat, hands down.

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  #49  
Old 12/20/09, 01:13 AM
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Not sure I should check in on this thread from time to time if I'm on the nightshift and haven't had my supper break yet! All this talk of steaks and fat is making me hungry!

I've got two I'm feeding out at the time. One is Jersey/MS cross steer 7months old (about 450lbs) The other is MS/Holstein/Simmental cross 8 months old (about 550lbs.) They are on grass/hay with free choice mineral, water, and a minimal amount of grain supplement per day. At the current cost of feed, they're getting treated like normal beef cows for the winter and then raised to whatever weight they can gain on grass during next year's growing season. I plan on scheduling a butcher date for them next winter so they can be on corn chops for a few weeks prior to slaughter.
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  #50  
Old 12/20/09, 02:50 AM
 
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We have tried Holstein, Jersey, Angus, Charlois, all good. The yellow fat on the Jersey wasn't tasty to us at all, so we won't do Jersey again.
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  #51  
Old 12/20/09, 07:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OJ Rallye View Post
Interesting thread and it inspired me to get out the bill for the last beef we bought. Grass fed not certified organic. I opted for 1/2 steer to get some of all cuts. Billed:
190# beef @ $2.75# = $522.50
$98.15 butchers fees (mentions 190# cut,wrap and freeze)
$620.65 total 3 boxes of freezer wrapped meat and soup bones. I weighed all the packages and it was under 125# with the wrapping.
LAdy we bought it from called to ask how we liked it. Flavor is great but how could we get only 120#s of meat and bones from 1/2 a steer and pay over $600? "You lose a lot in processing!" That was before I found out how fat the ground beef is.

Did she keep almost 1/3 of the meat we bought?
With a steer what are the percentages of weight ie. live vs hanging vs processed?
Wow...sounds like you paid double for live weight. I'm in Canada and when we buy 1/2 cow we pay about $2. per/lb whatever the dressed weight is. That would still equal $1 per/lb live weight (stockyard price) for example.

If a cow weighed 1000lbs, (1000 x $1= $1000) it would dress out to about 500lbs. (500 x $2 = $1000) plus processor which would add another $.50 or so per lb.

Sounds like to me, she charged you the live weight price on the dressed weight. Which means she doubled it on the 190lbs. Ultimately you paid about $5. per/lb for your 120 lbs of meat which is close to supermarket prices here.

ETA..maybe you didn't get all your meat if the processor charged you for 190lbs.

Last edited by ErbcroftFarms; 12/20/09 at 07:48 AM.
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  #52  
Old 12/30/09, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by ErbcroftFarms View Post
Wow...sounds like you paid double for live weight. I'm in Canada and when we buy 1/2 cow we pay about $2. per/lb whatever the dressed weight is. That would still equal $1 per/lb live weight (stockyard price) for example.

If a cow weighed 1000lbs, (1000 x $1= $1000) it would dress out to about 500lbs. (500 x $2 = $1000) plus processor which would add another $.50 or so per lb.

Sounds like to me, she charged you the live weight price on the dressed weight. Which means she doubled it on the 190lbs. Ultimately you paid about $5. per/lb for your 120 lbs of meat which is close to supermarket prices here.

ETA..maybe you didn't get all your meat if the processor charged you for 190lbs.

I'm with you. When we sell 1/2 of our daughter's show steer every year we charge $1.90-2.00 per pound hanging weight and the buyer pays their own processing fees. $2.75 per pound live weight is a little steep!
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  #53  
Old 01/02/10, 08:22 PM
 
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used to slaughter a steer every year for the last ten have switched to slaughtering an older cull cow . older cows marble rappidly long before there is a cover fat young steers have to have a thick fat cover before they start to marble . have had no trouble with tough cuts if i did i would just get some of the comercial tenderizers , have had quite a few people rave about how good the meat is .
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  #54  
Old 01/15/10, 07:53 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
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I sell freezer beef. This is what works the best in my opinion. Angus X. I've done all Angus and in some of my calves they are full angus. The reason I prefer a X is not only you get an animal that with weigh more, a tad less marbling which I consider better but the mamas in all other breeds made more milk for their calf.

I generally do LimoXAngus I am telling you the meat is excellent. Prime Rib was really good this last Christmas. If you put a pure Angus and an Angus X you wouldn't notice ANY difference in taste but than again you would have an animal with more meat.
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  #55  
Old 01/15/10, 08:02 AM
 
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we raise black angus
have about 30 right now

we would butcher in the 900-1000 range area for our freezer
pasture all the time, throw some grain out for feeding and supp hay in dead of winter

We prefer to hang ours for about 2 weeks at the butcher also.

Only 3 of us so MIL gets some beef etc. I like to use up my beef and not have it too long in the freezer.


YUMMY
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  #56  
Old 01/15/10, 11:20 AM
 
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I recently ordered my first side of beef from a local certified organic farm who has a processing facility onsite.
Their animals are raised on 172 acres, grass fed only and antibiotic/hormone free.
I am paying $2.25 lb hanging weight and then a 55 cent cut/wrap fee per lb.
No other costs for the processing or disposal etc.
I had looked around for grass fed and chemical free beef but its very expensive to purchase cuts, one place charges $8.59 lb for the most basic cuts and over $13.00lb for the better cuts.
Going with a side of beef not only is better financially but I can stock my freezer with beef for a long period of time which I feel good about.
I raise all my own meat chickens and my family doesn't really eat any other meat( maybe some bacon)well aside from beef and chicken so I was grateful to have found this farm with such quality beef.
However if we do need other types of meat they raise all their own organically so its a great resource for us.
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  #57  
Old 02/14/10, 06:52 PM
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Just got my first home raised beef back from butcher. I have been eating Dexter beef for about 6 years, bought by the cut from a grassfed herd. Finally got a few acres to raise my own. I've had Charlais, angus, longhorn, bison, dexter and Jersey and while they are all great, I'm kinda' partial to Jersey. That being said, I purchased a Jersey Bull calf to breed to my dexter cow. Can't wait!
Sent my steer in at 18 months. He was a little on the small side(even for a dexter!) as he had been abandoned shortly after birth, and had not nursed for a day or two when they found him. Ended up with 262#'s of beef with a processing/kill fee of $212. Paid $400 for him and put about $100 in milk replacer (he was already 3 monthes old when I bought him) and $200 in hay (I fed alot of alfalfa, because that's what my neighbor grows). So, total cost was $912 or $3.48/lb. if he was all burger. I pay $4.50 for ground Jersey and up to $11/lb for strip steak. Was it worth it? Yes. Do I like knowing what goes into my food? Yes. Will I keep on doing it? You betcha'!
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  #58  
Old 03/29/10, 04:42 PM
 
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On the all grass fed vs grain fed, various types of grasses cause beef to have high levels of conjugated linoleic acid and a healthy balance of omega 3 fatty acids. When you switch to grain to finish, the balance of omega's go to the unhealthy omega 6 fatty acids, and you lose a good deal if not all of the CLA.

Some causes for off flavor's in grass fed and finished beef can be types of grasses, stress, illness or infection, and season change. As the season change and the types and quality of forage change so does their rumen. This rumen change can cause an off flavor in your beef. You want to make sure your grass finished beef has a consistent diet of similar forage for 60 to 90 days if possible, and if good forage management is used off flavors from undesired grasses should not be an issue. Also note that "aging or dry aging" beef will cause off flavors to intensify. If you are concerned about off flavors or have had a history of them consider shortening the aging process, until you can eliminate the source of off flavor. Also it is important to cool the carcass more slowly when aging a grass finished beef because it does not have the insulation barrier that grain finished beef will have. (this has to do with tenderness)

Please note, I am only restating what I have read in many different places, and have no practical experience in the matter. I am in the infantile process of raising beef. I have 2 red polled heifers I bought last year that will be ready to breed in June, and I have 4 bottle calves I bought a few weeks ago. I am just skimming these forums for info on bottle calves, and I saw some confusion on grass finishing beef. I just wanted to regurgitate from some of my research. Hope it is helpful. I am not trying to sound smarter than I am. Thanks. I am a huge proponent of grass fed and finished, I think it is much healthier. I also think using it requires some education. I think grass finishing requires intensive grazing practices. And these are very environmentally responsible. I get very excited about potentially producing beef that can also heel the land and the air. Kind of like putting back more than I take away, merely through proper management.

I don't judge others who do it differently, they too have much knowledge to share. I just happen to have a different philosophy and priorities.

Last edited by trbizwiz; 03/29/10 at 04:52 PM.
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  #59  
Old 04/21/10, 04:47 PM
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I would like more info on the HOW part of it.
I have butchered3 steer in the past few years. i still have no idea what I am doing, I just cut. I would really like to find a step by step guide. One that goes beyond the standard butcher shop poster.
I need to see where to cut and know what cuts I will have when I cut in that spot.
Does that guide exist?
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  #60  
Old 04/28/10, 09:31 AM
 
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http://www.askthemeatman.com has videos that you can buy to show you how to cut up beef. I don't have it so I don't know how good it is but you might want to check into it

greg
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