You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of Homesteading Today!    
Homesteading Forum

Go Back   Homesteading Forum > Livestock Forums > Cattle

Cattle For Those Who Like To Have A Cow.


Like Tree25Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.
  #21  
Old 01/18/06, 09:38 AM
milkstoolcowboy's Avatar
Farmer
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: MN
Posts: 337
Ken,

One caution is that if this study is published in 1974, it must be using breed information from before '74. The genetic evolution or progress of these breeds, particularly over a 30+ year period, is not inconsequential. The 1970 Angus is not the same as the 2006 Angus.

Second, the study just assigned ratings to these four general categories, but it sounds like you then took this data an imposed equal weights across the four categories. Most cattlemen would want to place higher weights on rate of gain, feed conversion, and carcass quality. This is what Tinknal is getting at.

Third, there is no reason to believe that the sample is normally distributed, but say it is. Then the number of observations which should fall within + or - one standard deviation is 68 percent. The number of observations (percent of distribution) which should between + or 1 two standard deviations is about 95.45 percent.

In my experience, Jersey calves are tough little sh*ts and survivors, but they take forever to finish. Feeding out Holstein steers is not at all uncommon. I've had real good luck with survival rates of Holstein bull calves, but they are from my cows, not bought at the sale barn. You have a day-old calf, truck him to the sale barn, have him stand there a few hours and then haul him home, that's a lot of stress on any young animal. I've always heard that the frailest dairy breed in terms of calf mortality are Guernseys.
__________________
"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity." Gen. George S. Patton Jr.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 01/18/06, 01:22 PM
In Remembrance
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 6,844
I believe you are correct on the standard deviation spread. Long time since I took statistics. I agree on changes in breed. For example, today's milk line Hosteins are way, way different than say 1955. Then they were basically barrels with legs. Now they are breed for height and large udders apparently.
Jimoutside likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 01/17/08, 09:13 AM
In Remembrance
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 6,844
Admin. action.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 01/17/08, 10:16 AM
francismilker's Avatar
Udderly Happy!
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 2,835
Very interesting thread Ken. And also some good points made on the pros and cons of jersey beef.
I do have one quetions however: I've heard that in order to become "certified angus" beef on the market, it doesn't neccessarily have to be an angus animal? I heard that rather the carcass has to attain a certain criteria based upon it's grade and marbleing. Is this correct anyone?
__________________
Francismilker

"The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much" James 5:16
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 04/15/09, 04:25 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 13
Female Holstein

I have never raised a cow. I just bought a 3 month old female holstein to put in my freezer. I hope I did the right thing.
I'm planning on keeping her about 14 months.
Is the female meat as good as the male?

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 04/15/09, 10:37 PM
Bovine and Range Nerd
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 911
Francis--from what I heard, yes this is correct. CAB can be from cattle that have other breeds in the woodpile along with Angus. Just so long as the beef is considered premium would the marketing standard for CAB prevail.

Jhuffman, there have been studies done that beef from heifers isn't any different from that of steers. However the time needed to have them fill out and get enough meat on their bodies instead of fat is different than males. At 14 months I'm certain she's ready for the freezer now.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 04/16/09, 11:09 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: NW OK
Posts: 3,746
Quote:
Originally Posted by francismilker View Post
Very interesting thread Ken. And also some good points made on the pros and cons of jersey beef.
I do have one quetions however: I've heard that in order to become "certified angus" beef on the market, it doesn't neccessarily have to be an angus animal? I heard that rather the carcass has to attain a certain criteria based upon it's grade and marbleing. Is this correct anyone?
They have to be black and the CAB inspector give them the nod. It's a good premium on the ones that make it.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 04/17/09, 05:53 AM
In Remembrance
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 6,844
Making a sticky again. Don't know how it fell off consolidated list.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 08/13/09, 02:11 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: eastern nc
Posts: 46
Hi, Ken and thank you for keeping this thread going! I am about ready to purchase a few cows to put on pasture (about 10 acres currently fenced) and have found polled hereford cow/calf pairs bred back for what seems to be a good price. (The calves are heifers). I am hesitant to go with this breed, now! My Dad originally owned this property and always had the typical white faced angus herd. These pastures havent seen any livestock for a few years. My question is: would I be better off going with a couple of the hereford pairs and then try to find a dairy bull for the next breeding? Or do the purebred polled herefords seem to do well with rotational grazing? I'm basically just wanting to get the grazing underway and getting the pasures in better condition. Hope I'm making sense!
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 08/14/09, 04:16 AM
In Remembrance
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 6,844
I recommend going with a black bull (preferably Angus) so you produce what are locally called 'Black Baldies'. Market seems to like them quite well.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 08/14/09, 01:11 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: eastern nc
Posts: 46
Okay, thanks for the input!
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 08/14/09, 02:36 PM
Bovine and Range Nerd
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 911
Metam, Herefords will do just as well on rotational grazing as Angus or Angus crosses. Just so long as you have make the right purchase and ask all the right questions, they should be ideal for your situation. Since you only have 10 ac to mess around with, which means you'll probably only build your herd up to about 5 to 10 head, I'd rotate: Angus one year and Hereford the next, so that you could either keep the baldy heifers and sell the steers, or sell all baldies and keep the Hereford straightbreds. Or, better yet, breed Hereford to all cows and heifers and once you've reached your maximum herd size, breed Angus to them to get your black baldies. Beyond that is up to you to decide.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 08/14/09, 03:38 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: eastern nc
Posts: 46
Thank you, KarinL! Other than the issues with the pinkeye and udder placement are there any specific questions you would ask?
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 08/14/09, 11:47 PM
Bovine and Range Nerd
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 911
Well, I would ask to see the sire and the dam, and to ask what the birthweight of the cow was as well as the calf that is at side, ask what where the average birthweights and weaning weights of the brothers and sisters of that cow are, how the dam and sire are kept in condition throughout the year (breeding, calving, weaning), how the cattle are fed relative to how you want to feed them (hay and grass only or hay and grain with grass), and any problems with calving, prolapse, and abortions. You'd really have to know about conformation to know what to look for in a good cow, and that's both with udder placement and size, feet, legs, topline, femininity/masculinity, gut, hindquarter, heartgirth, length, barrel, hip and shoulders. If you google "beef cattle conformation" (or use any other search engine you prefer), you will get plenty of hits on what to study in regards in this manner. You should also know about body condition scoring, a method of determining how fat a cow is in regards to fertility and feed convertability. Speaking of fertility, you should also ask what the rate is for having cows coming up open, length of breeding season and subsequently length of calving season. Also, ask to look at the calves he/she has and you HAVE to go past the point of their cuteness to see the quality. I'm sure some folks might fill in some details that I missed, but that's pretty much what I'd be asking about if I were in your shoes. Hope that helps some.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 08/14/09, 11:50 PM
Bovine and Range Nerd
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 911
Oh, and one more thing. If you haven't already, read my post on the thread "Hereford vs. Angus" to get a feel for what you're looking for if you haven't read it already.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 08/24/09, 03:01 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: eastern nc
Posts: 46
Thanks again, KarinL. And I had allready read your post on Hereford vs Angus, as well! I'm still doing my research, and since the polled Herfords I had found are 7 hours from me, I'm gonna start pestering some of the local farmers here who don't participate in rotaional grazing (not intensive, at least) to see what I might be able to purchase from them. Just gonna make sure I ask the right questions, now that I know what to ask I'll certainly keep you posted.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 08/25/09, 01:23 PM
Bovine and Range Nerd
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 911
Glad I could help.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01/05/10, 02:02 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2
Jersey and Guernsey beef will rank at or near the top of any taste or tenderness test. The obvious drawbacks are that they don't grow as quickly, nor are they as heavily muscled as beef breeds. Jerseys and Guernsey produce beta carotene instead of vitamin A, which is then bound to the fat in their milk and their bodies, producing golden yellow butter, but also yellow sub-cu fat. The effect is not nearly as strong on the feedlot as it is when animals are grazed. But, with a little education about beta carotene, it would seem that yellow fat could be seen as healthier.
Pokletu and Jimoutside like this.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 12/02/10, 05:18 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 719
I love my red polls. They are smaller framed cows, good milkers, good mamas, put on condition well on straight grass due to their low stress, heat tolerance, and smaller frame.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01/11/11, 09:11 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Northern KY
Posts: 171
Ken,

Would it be possible to get the data broke down to the top 10 breeds in each catagory? Maybe you posted it someplace else already. I am just curious how the more common beef breeds finish in any catagory. They must excel at something? I would guess maternal traits, but milking is probably in there. Just a thought. I know this is an old sticky so maybe nobody else is interested.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:52 AM.